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Thread: Chorus Effect on Dimension of your track

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    Chorus Effect on Dimension of your track

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    Hey guys,

    I have a question about what chorus can do to the dimension/width/depth of your track. And how this is applied.

    In advance, thanks for responding.

    Greetings from The Netherlands
    Last edited by Slayerstation; 06-12-2019 at 11:11 AM.

  2. #2
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    Chorus has no effect on mix width/dimension per se. It is a delay-based doubling of a signal; a stereo chorus would do so in stereo, so by definition I suppose there is a slight dimensional aspect, but it is generally applied to individual tracks, not an entire mix. Can you be a little more specific about what it is you're wondering and/or trying to do??


    GJ
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






  3. #3
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    I read somewhere that chorus can push back a instrument/sound back in the mix and I wondered how. There is no specific thing I'm trying to do, I was just wondering why. Because I never saw chorus like a effect to create depth in a mix. Only that it becomes less focused when used and for widening sounds. Unfortunately, my english has some flaws so I hope you can decode my explanation :P

    And thanks for your time replying
    Last edited by Slayerstation; 06-13-2019 at 09:49 AM.

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    No problem.

    Adding too many and/or too much time-based effects (chorus and delay on everything, reverb on everything, then reverb on the entire mix) can certainly become a distraction, cause individual elements to be "less focused," and the mix to be what we might term overall as "murky" or "muddy" (though that last term is often referring to too much lower mid-range in a mix).

    Careful use of effects (and proper panning) can add character, depth, and a sense of space to the elements of a mix, as well as the overall mix itself. The key is adding a little at a time, and not going overboard. As far as bringing things "forward," that is a matter of turning individual elements up or down (volume)...

    GJ
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






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    Ok nice to know

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