What are the cons of collaborating using .wav files?

wavewar3

New member
So if two people had two different daws , and just sent each other the wav files of the patterns with the mixing effects already on them , would they run in to any trouble besides the size of the wav files? I think I've seen this once before in a livestream but I'm not sure if you might as well not collab if you don't have the same daw.
 

Ddream

New member
So if two people had two different daws , and just sent each other the wav files of the patterns with the mixing effects already on them , would they run in to any trouble besides the size of the wav files? I think I've seen this once before in a livestream but I'm not sure if you might as well not collab if you don't have the same daw.

I do collabs mostly with wav files as my main partners work with different daws. And never had problems using them. We are fond of resampling, so wav files are the best use here.

Also, every daw can pick a wav file and transform it into midi now, so, there's virtually no difference between collabing using the same daw or not.
 

Wapiti

New member
Also, every daw can pick a wav file and transform it into midi now, so, there's virtually no difference between collabing using the same daw or not.

This is so false. MIDI is information, unrelated to audio waveforms.

As for the original poster, It is very normal, lots of people will bounce all of there tracks down to stems in .wav format for a final mixdown. and if you are sending them to a mix engineer you would most definitely bounce them to .wav or .aiff.

However, keep in mind you should avoid any mix processing on these stems, keep creative plug-ins but I would recommend using the mixing plug-ins only when you are actually mixing down the project itself.
 

bandcoach

Zukatoku - Mod Scientist
it is even common to print to audio any outboard processing that you do in one studio simply because you will not have it available at another studio where you continue to work on the same track - i.e. if you patch an external compressor or eq or fx unit into the processing chain, you print the result to a new audio track so that you always have the sound applied to the original audio

and I have to reinforce wapitis statement about daws extracting midi data from an audio file - simple monophonic audio (individual drum hits and maybe solo instrument lines like bass or brass- or wood-wind and some single note string lines) can be converted to related midi data, but, in the main, it is a pipe dream pursued by many a PhD candidate to extract all of the data that an audio recording holds into a cognate midi file - most humans struggle with the task of doing the same thing when transcribing to paper or their instrument
 
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