using other people to mix and master my music

laup

New member
Hi


I am a songwriter/composer/arranger. This is what I love doing, I make extensive use of music technology in order to do this and I am adept at doing so. However I find mixing and mastering a real chore, to the point where it really kills my ability to produce a finished track (this is in the context of holding down a full time job) and my desire to go into my home studio.


I have decided to start to use other people to mix and master my songs. In my situation it is worth paying other people rather than devoting time and expense into learning this art (which i really do not want to do). I also think having another person's perspective on my track is incredibly helpful. I am also very keen to start finishing and releasing my music.


What are people's experiences of using other people to mix and master their songs? How much should I expect to pay? Has anybody else felt the way I do and what did you do about it?


Thanks in advance,


Paul
 

SRXjwKs7

Member
Its difficult to learn but not impossible but you definitely need patience which sounds like something you don't have. Paying someone else to mix/master your music has its pros and cons but its also a fresh set of ears that might hear something you don't. Pricing varies especially if they're using analog gear but you got to watch out for fly by night guys and scammers.
 

Storm

Member
I agree with SRX. They are two different skills. You can choose to learn it but you're better off sticking to what you're passionate about and paying someone to do the other parts. Find a trusted person and work with them over and over again until you can read each other's minds on the intent of the arrangement or the dynamics and your own personal creativity will be heightened in the parts you like to do. One-man operations are mind-numbing in the end and can burn a person out creatively over time.
 

chris carter

New member
Pricing for mix engineers is all over the place depending on their skill and professionalism (two separate things). Anything from a few hundred to a few thousand (and more) per song. You also need to take into account consistency because any idiot can make one good mix – the hard part is doing it over and over and over consistently. Use word of mouth and discographies and then listen to a lot of their stuff. I will say this: avoid any mixing “company.” They are almost all universally bad. Any good mix engineer survives on just their name. Also avoid anybody who uses stock photos of gear on their website (just do google image searches on their images) as that’s nearly always a dead giveaway of utter b.s.

I completely disagree about the previous comment about “analog” gear. Virtually ALL major label mixes are done 100% or possibly 99.5% in the box.
 

Zacobe

Obe1Cannoli
The answer will depend on the quality of mix you desire. If you want something of professional quality then you won't be able to achieve that on your own in short amount of time. Not unless you are being mentored by a professional for a couple years. Also, even if you are taught all the mixing tricks, it still takes a long time to be able to psychologically hear what a mix needs. Training your ear to hear when something needs to be compressed, and when you've fixed it, is extremely difficult. Same thing for EQ.

If you just want it to not be terrible, you could spend some time learning about it and be able to put something out that isn't completely terrible. My gut says you won't be satisfied with what you can achieve if you don't put years into learning how to mix.

I would say go on forums like this and find people who are solely focused on mixing, and are learning how to be better. They are always looking for projects to practice on. Chances are they are at least much better than you, and you can get something done for free. Otherwise just go on SoundBetter and find yourself a pro. You can get a good mix for s reasonable price there.
 

Zacobe

Obe1Cannoli
lVirtually ALL major label mixes are done 100% or possibly 99.5% in the box.

This is nonsense, and you couldn't possibly know this for a fact anyway. Nobody has done a study on all mixing engineers working for major record labels to see what gear they're using.

Every major label has nice studios with big SSL boards and analog gear, and they are definitely using them. I think mid-level engineers (not working for major labels) are more likely to be in the box for efficiency and cost savings. But there even tons of mid level engineers with home studios full of analog gear.

Concerning the original point, there may be a correlation between analog gear and price, but there certainly are people out there that will mix for a reasonable price with analog gear. However don't get trapped into this thought that analog mixes are better than in the box, it's just not true. Most people wouldn't be able tell the difference between an analog mix and a digital mix. Skill is what makes a good mix.
 

junyadrin

Member
Hi


I am a songwriter/composer/arranger. This is what I love doing, I make extensive use of music technology in order to do this and I am adept at doing so. However I find mixing and mastering a real chore, to the point where it really kills my ability to produce a finished track (this is in the context of holding down a full time job) and my desire to go into my home studio.


I have decided to start to use other people to mix and master my songs. In my situation it is worth paying other people rather than devoting time and expense into learning this art (which i really do not want to do). I also think having another person's perspective on my track is incredibly helpful. I am also very keen to start finishing and releasing my music.


What are people's experiences of using other people to mix and master their songs? How much should I expect to pay? Has anybody else felt the way I do and what did you do about it?


Thanks in advance,


Paul
i will mix and master a song or two for free to see if you like it. i have some new gear i want to test out. i enjoy all types of music
 
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