Riddim Makers

DJ Trigonometry

New member
Aight. Lets get **** poppin in this section. Who makes dancehall riddims. **** like u hear big artists get on. Riddims like stuff that don corleone or stephen mcgregor makes. Im starting to do all that. Anyone else into that? Maybe we can help each other out or something.
 

MADMIXA the DJ

New member
I make them... and my sound is like... me.(I'm not that vain to compare my riddims to anyone else... but, I will make a strong effort to represent)
 

DJ Trigonometry

New member
I make riddims too. When I was talking about them I meant by the overall sound of them. That new mainstream dancehall sound. Over 2008 i been drifting away from remixing and started moving over to production. I have one riddim already finished. It's called Additional Death Riddim. Keep an eye out for that one. When i make riddims, the trouble I have is making the melody. If anyone has any tips that can help out that ittl be greatly appreciated. After i get the melody down everyting criss!!!
 

MADMIXA the DJ

New member
DJ Trigonometry said:
I make riddims too. When I was talking about them I meant by the overall sound of them. That new mainstream dancehall sound. Over 2008 i been drifting away from remixing and started moving over to production. I have one riddim already finished. It's called Additional Death Riddim. Keep an eye out for that one. When i make riddims, the trouble I have is making the melody. If anyone has any tips that can help out that ittl be greatly appreciated. After i get the melody down everyting criss!!!
Here's one thing I had to learn... from way back... find your initial theme and match your production to create that picture. This also means that some riddims are going to be created, unlike the previous ones. Some cats get into an addictive routine of creating tracks in a particular order... but, often you'll find out that... not all riddims or beats need a full blown orchestration or a wide variety of sounds to be complete. Dancehall, Soca, Roots, Dub, Step, etc..., if you really listen to them, are created based on an initial theme.
To me... there are a few key things I had to overcome.
1) I try not to over produce my joints. Just because I don't have an artist immediately at my disposal... I have to leave openings for the artist to create their vision. I have to remind myself that "my role" is mearly 1/3 or 1/4 of the actual song.
2) Having a variety of sounds at my disposal, helps me to be able to project my imagination... to create the scenes or to project my visions. A lot of times... producers run across a creative block, simply because they feel that their sound kits have been exhausted or over used.
3) Who said that you can only use one harmony? What about something different for the intro, bridge, or outro or even remixing your own work?
4) Dispite what anyone might claim... dancehall doesn't have a basic 'one size fits all' drum pattern. Most dancehall riddims are audio interpretations of motions or dances that relates to the theme of the project. (If you need a homework assignment... create a harmony that discribes YOU. Then try creating harmonies that descibe how you work, how you eat, how you drive, how you screw, how or why you pray, etc. Capture yourself with your creations and then you'll find it easier to capture or create highly visual audio interpretations of others.)
5) I can't tell you how you should structure your melody, I can only suggest that "we" should practice and open our individual visions and find the best sounds that help create that picture. I can't front... I've been making hiphop joints since the early 80's and it took to the late 90's for me to feel that my sound kits and drum programming was up to par to represent dancehall respectfully.(That means getting to a point to which my material wasn't a knockoff of current riddims)

The last thing I want... is to follow the sound that is currently out. If you listen to it... a lot of it... is like that late 90's early 2000 hiphop sound... the epic/preset sounds that are the signature sounds of a lot of these popular workstations. Going that route... with my production.... is not for me.:cheers:
 

THE MASTERMIND

New member
Well i'm a jamaican teen i'm a upcomming producer.I do hip but i want to do dancehall but i need much help so feel free to sen on any tips or styles.....................bless
 

JokkeL

New member
started making riddims for about 6 months ago. Been a heavy listener to reggae/dancehall for about 6 or 7 years. I recommend listening ALOT to the riddims that came out in the 70's/80's/90's and up to now. Take whatever drums that stands alone and sample them. After a while you'll have a library of "reggae sounding" drums. As far as creating melodies, I would recommend getting a synth of some sort and learn how to play it. Take piano lessons or some **** :P Go hardware as much as possible and do some research to find out what kind of synths, instruments, samplers and effect processors that other great riddim producers use. Sampling old guitar/piano/organ loops from vinyl can give that "magic" sound, because they used different equipment back then. I personally learned the most from listening a lot to reggae.
 

nicko11

beginner
dancehall riddim making

well im in the dancehall riddim making like you but need more practice but im getting there just need the proper equipments like a proper computer i use fruity loops no instruments to itself but i would like to make my own studio cause i like to produce and yea we can help each other

thanks for the help and tips
 
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Dj Mendoja

New member
Wicked Riddim!!!!!

mistaox said:
Same here.
I make Riddims now and then, but the melody is always a struggle.
here is one of my recent tunes:
:victory::monkey:I just listened to it about 15 times in a row. sound's real nice. I would love to hear it with a vocal track.
 

Dallaz P.

New member
I am kinda new to making riddims but here is my two cents about dancehall riddims.

Dancehall music have changed rapidly in the last couple of years and producers like stephen mcgregor, daseca and don corleone are responsible for the revolution. I like the flavour nowadays though, they have incorporated alot of intruments not presently used in dancehal riddims such as alot of strings, piano and flutes. They have also up the tempo but the dancehal feel is still there. Some other producers have remixed techno beats and given them a dancehall feel. All in all i have to say to stay relevant as a dancehall producer you have to do some critical listening to nowadys riddims and maybe add your own little flare to it.
 
the thing is with the new dancehall is that thers's just more hip hop mixed into it there's also techno and other stuff 2 but it's more hip hop, all the new school dancehall artist like aidonia, kartel, busy, rhyno etc. they are all basically just rapping in there own jamaican thwang that's all it is, the way i see it producers like stephen and those guys just adabted 2 that, by the way i'm from trinidad and i also make dancehall, reggae, soca, r&b and hip hop
 

mysticmovements

New member
riddim makers

I make riddims/beats. New style dancehall/hip hop productions. If any artists or producers want to collaborate, hit me up! check out some of my productions on my myspace page @ /brandoriddims
 

redmase

New member
hey I'm trying to do a album for the summer looking to do something different where are u located

---------- Post added at 12:00 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:51 AM ----------

yo I'm not geting through how can I.
 
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