how to raise volume of final mix without clipping?

Chris Torio

New member
I know a lot of you probably would laugh at this question but im working in FL studio and i know your not supposed to mess with the master track so my question is how do i raise the volume with out touching the master fader?? Would you put a limited on the whole track if so how would you go about that?

Thank you
 

Adrian-MarQ

New member
I would adjust the volume of each individual track before turning up the volume of the entire track. Once it sounds balanced, then load up FL limiter on your master channel and increase the gain.

I strongly encourage you to work on balancing your sounds more by turning some sounds down and trying compression since clipping seems to be an issues for you. Also, if you post an audio example I'll be able to give specific suggestions.
 

laurend

Active member
Just use a limiter on your master buss when rendering/boucing/mixdown. You can gain few dBs on your average level.
 
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Anonity

New member
You can try a free program named Audacity to boost the volume. Just export your audio in FL Studio and place it in audacity and play around with the faders on the left side.
 

Drtro

New member
How do you make break downs or moments in the song where say it's just a bass and snare pattern have the same db levels as the peak chorus moments but still sound quiet? I think it's called normalizing?
 

Adrian-MarQ

New member
Nope. That's done with mixing my friend. Normalizing = bringing the volume up or down until the loudest peak reaches a specified level (usually 0 dbfs).

Post an audio example of what you are referring to and I can give some tips on how to achieve the sound.
 

Drtro

New member
Nope. That's done with mixing my friend. Normalizing = bringing the volume up or down until the loudest peak reaches a specified level (usually 0 dbfs).

Post an audio example of what you are referring to and I can give some tips on how to achieve the sound.

Any professional song. I load it up in the master and it's constantly peaking at 0db even when it's just a drum break or all instruments playing, even though the drum break doesn't sound as loud.
 

Adrian-MarQ

New member
That's done with compression and limiting. It likely doesn't sound loud due to having a smaller dynamic range (meaning there is not much differece between the loud and soft parts)
 

KeithPalmerry

New member
Basically what you're looking to do is to decrease the dynamic range of the track. Generally most people will take individual tracks like the main melodic instruments, the kick and snare, and the bass and saturate/compress/limit them. There are tons of tutorials out there on how to compress instruments properly so I won't go into it very much but generally do most of the work with the compressors, lowering the dynamic range, and then use the limiter lightly (probably never passing 6dB gain reduction). If you want more bite on your kick and snare, try using a soft clipper and clip them a few dB after compressing, as a substitute for limiting. When you finish your mix, export it in a raw format at 24 bit and then master the outputted track. There's also a ton of tutorials on mastering so I won't elaborate very much but try using an eq for last minute leveling, a little saturation, some multi-band compression and "glue compression" (google it; Waves SSL Comp is pretty good) and limiting/clipping. That will hopefully allow you to gain a few more dB. Hope this helps.
 
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