Best Advice Given To You As A Producer?

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OmegaBeatz

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1. Imitate, then innovate - Knowing how to be great before becoming great while developing your own sound.

2. Write a weekly comprehensive self-evaluation - addressing your improvements/weaknesses, noting what works and what doesn't

3. Delete the worst tracks (or the most mediocre ones) you've made every month. Compete with your very best to remain consistent.

4. Have multiple backup devices and schedule a backup ever 1-2 weeks (project files, samples, documents, track log, songs, Project settings etc.)



What advice given to you has helped you develop as a producer?
 
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j.troup

New member
^^^^

1) I remember JD saying that.

2) Ryan Leslie told me to do HONEST SELF ASSESSMENT. To be real with myself and my skill level, as it relates to the competition...Like Swizz, Timbo, Dre, etc.


That's the best advice anyone has ever given me.
 

OmegaBeatz

New member
^^^^

1) I remember JD saying that.

2) Ryan Leslie told me to do HONEST SELF ASSESSMENT. To be real with myself and my skill level, as it relates to the competition...Like Swizz, Timbo, Dre, etc.


That's the best advice anyone has ever given me.

Yes, Self-evaluation/Self-assessment is probably the most important skill to learn when improving any talent you want to develop. If you want to be great, you can't be scared to compare your work with the greatest.

:cheers:
 

j.troup

New member
Yes, Self-evaluation/Self-assessment is probably the most important skill to learn when improving any talent you want to develop. If you want to be great, you can't be scared to compare your work with the greatest.

:cheers:



When I took my ass off my shoulders, and took my hater glasses off, I was able to see that my music wasn't anywhere NEAR as good as I thought they were.

And when I did that, I was really able to grow at an amazing rate...because I was able to actually SEE where my music was lacking, and address it.
 

OmegaBeatz

New member
Some guy here said this.... : D

Quantity really shouldn't matter at all.


If anybody tells you they make 5+ beats a day.





They are idiots.






Learn how to make one great/quality track - no matter how long it takes, then learn to be consistent and create many.


That is what separates the greats from the mediocre.
 

flipn50

New member
Make the beat, never let the beat makes you.



jk


Collaborate with other producers.

Build a team.
 

DjayCas

New member
yo they ****in deleted my dinosaurs from my sig.

industry rule #4,530.

do not delete the dinosaurs from djaycas' sig
 

Rob Bec

New member
My boy Enigma (produced Bun-B ft. Lupe "Swang on 'Em") said something real when we were talking in da studio a few weeks ago......

"I'm not the best producer ever. Maybe not even the best from this city. But, its not JUST about being the best producer. Building relationships is JUST as important. Some of the work I got (Scareface, Z-Ro, Bun-B, Pastor Troy) was just off the fact they liked me and how I handled buisness. I'm just a cool, level headed dude and I know how to talk to and get along with people."
 

Big Chet

New member
certainly probably definately nothing anybody said here....

what the **** u expect to learn in a forum full or competing producers????

it's advice u give urself

holla
 

K-1ne

Real name: Guerilla Major
From Maestro:

Find your own artists, work with and develop them.
Stop chasing these major rappers.
 

OmegaBeatz

New member
certainly probably definately nothing anybody said here....

what the **** u expect to learn in a forum full or competing producers????

it's advice u give urself

holla

arigold.gif
 

BxJaze

New member
Neptunes said it best.

LEARN YOUR EQUIPMENT. Be comfortable with your sounds and your equipment. If you use a keyboard, know it in and out. The options, the menus, everything. Same with a MPC. I've been using computers since elementary school, and i can navigate through them like nothing. And when I got that comfortable with my MPC, it was beautiful. That was the best advice I've heard. Whatever if is you use, before you get a whole bunch of stuff...master YOUR tools of the trade.



And all the stuff about self-assessment and evaluating your stuff vs the big names is all true, cause we can all (ok not all) can make a living doing this, but if you're talking about the big name artists, just know that they've had your competition on speed dial long before you entered the scene. What kills me is when I'm in a studio, and a cat throws a beat on, and he and maybe 1 or 2 of his friends (complete with studio groupies just happy to be in a cool looking room as opposed to in some loser's basement) be the only ones boppin their head. The other 10 of us are sittin around like :|
 
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