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Thread: Top scales to Learn for all genres?

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    Top scales to Learn for all genres?

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    Opinions would be appreciated!

    I would personally say, the major and minor scales and blues scales for jazz/Gospel.

    I think all these scales cover pop/r&b/rock/classical/hip hop/electro"techno"dustep/country/Gospel

    What do ya'll think are important scales to learn for these genre's?

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    Knowing the function of harmonic and melodic guidetones is quite importand.
    I'd suggest to learn lydian and mixolydian next to major and minor, since those have a very clear character and are sometimes used in pop.
    For the more agressive transitions I sometimes use altered scales or the harmonic minor. (for second dominants)

    And the jazz/blues is also very useful. If you talk about gospel, chromatic harmonic progression gets importand, since diminished chords are used fairly often in standard progressions. For this type of chords you might use the half-tone-whole-tone scale (depends on the chord function whether it begins with half or whole.
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    right click to download. Take the file(s) to your local copy to print out a good size poster and laminate then put on your wall above your keyboard
    Last edited by bandcoach; 03-20-2013 at 12:31 PM. Reason: added 4 modes and 4 scales
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    Really, each major key has a relative minor key and vice versa, so as far as the actual scale goes, they're basically one and the same (same with aeolian, lydian, mixolydian, etc... because they all share the same notes but just start/end on a different scale degree). But if you want to know scales for ALL genres, then you should probably learn ALL the scales used in all genres.

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    I agree with everyone! Thanks bandcoach for that pdf file!!!

    And yes, every scale is important but oxygen you made a clear statement!!

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    When I teach I try to get my students to forget about "scales" as notes and get them to understand the pattern/math behind the scales. There are so many scales you can dig in to that you can literally spend the rest of your musical life learning them. Its the theory behind the scale that makes them work in real musical applications. What makes it major/minor/aug/dim and why would you use it. I personally still get dizzy thinking of all the letter names, modes, sharps, and flats. When I'm writing or improvising, thinking about all that sucks the life out of the music for me.

    I practice the scales (alot) for technique and to train my hands where to go on the instrument without thinking. When I'm writing/producing I go for the feeling...thats when you apply the theory behind the scale. Major (happy), Minor (sad), dim/aug (tension)...ect...
    ...once you get deep you start messing around with modes, world scales, altered scales.

    I learned the most about scales and how they relate to music through studying jazz charts. Through learning jazz songs from charts and improvising over the chords I learned the most about scales and how they relate to different types of music. John Coltrane said something like, "I try to learn everything I can about the theory & technique then I try to forget it." Get the technique and ear training from practicing the scales to the point where its engrained in your soul...then throw it all out the window and go for the feel of the genre/song you are aiming for. Hope this helps...

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