Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Is signal reverberation, reverberation? And is there such a thing as sound coating?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    1
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Is signal reverberation, reverberation? And is there such a thing as sound coating?

    Sign in to disable this ad
    Imagine there's a chamber and sound from the exterior is hitting it. The chamber makes the signal of this sound reverberate but doesn't bother doing the same with noise. With noise all it does is reverberate at a much smaller intensity. Is there a technical term for this type of reverberation, because as far as I understand right now, this wouldn't be reverberation, as reverberation would also reverberate at the same intensity with the noise, not just the signal, as it would copy the sound in its decay all the way into silence, with the same energy as the external sound.

    Now imagine this chamber were reverberating excessively to signal just like I describe in the previous paragraph, but that the difference from between when it didn't do this and to how it does so now is that now it is now in a state of permanent low-frequency vibration, whereas before it was silent. Would this new vibration be a factor in why this chamber is now behaving like this when hit by external sound? Would this vibration accompany in this manner- with an obsession with signal over noise- the external sound, with a low frequency coat? And if so, what would be the technical term for this process, where an external sound gets its signals coated by going through a noisy chamber tunnel?
    Last edited by jltfromtheb; 02-07-2018 at 06:24 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    USA: NorthEast Coast
    Posts
    2,660
    Thanks
    39
    Thanked 238 Times in 214 Posts
    AFAICT by what you are describing, it is just reverberant sound. I have never heard of anything called "signal coating." But what you are describing would cover mechanical reverb such as spring reverb, as well "echo chamber" reverb. There is a related concept called "sympathetic vibration" or "resonance," which also fits in with your description.

    GJ
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Posts
    34
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by jltfromtheb View Post
    Imagine there's a chamber and sound from the exterior is hitting it. The chamber makes the signal of this sound reverberate but doesn't bother doing the same with noise. With noise all it does is reverberate at a much smaller intensity. Is there a technical term for this type of reverberation, because as far as I understand right now, this wouldn't be reverberation, as reverberation would also reverberate at the same intensity with the noise, not just the signal, as it would copy the sound in its decay all the way into silence, with the same energy as the external sound.

    Now imagine this chamber were reverberating excessively to signal just like I describe in the previous paragraph, but that the difference from between when it didn't do this and to how it does so now is that now it is now in a state of permanent low-frequency vibration, whereas before it was silent. Would this new vibration be a factor in why this chamber is now behaving like this when hit by external sound? Would this vibration accompany in this manner- with an obsession with signal over noise- the external sound, with a low frequency coat? And if so, what would be the technical term for this process, where an external sound gets its signals coated by going through a noisy chamber tunnel?
    Hello there,

    Please forgive I've misunderstood, but are you asking "is there is such thing as a reverb device (which requires physical(air) interaction with the sound source to produce verb) that does not respond to audible noise---a device which inherently has a noise gate reaction to this type of input?"?

    Additionally, is your second statement saying you believe the reverb in this noise scenario is physically and consistently vibrating (creating frequency resonance) given the presence of noise in a signal to the device? That the noise is tainting the final reverb product with these additional resonances via noise input?

    if you are working with audio sources for music etc..I could suggest audio gates and other downward expansion processors. Using a gate/expander pre-chamber input could eliminate the noise before any chamber resonance (specific to source info down at noise-signal level) could build in the device. Using a gate/expander post-chamber processing could eliminate lingering decay of any relatively steady-state resonance produced in the reverb device. EQ is also your friend, again pre-EQ finding specific frequency resonances feeding the device signal, post-EQ cutting produced resonant frequencies

    Perhaps I've not connected with your original thoughts, but indeed these ideas came to mind!

    best,
    -MadHat

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •