Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 18 of 18

Thread: How do i count bars? (Yes google i know)

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Sign in to disable this ad
    The snares and claps aren’t always on the 2 and 4. Have you tried counting with the snare or clap on the 3?

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to BarryMcKockiner For This Useful Post:


  3. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    25
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BarryMcKockiner View Post
    The snares and claps aren’t always on the 2 and 4. Have you tried counting with the snare or clap on the 3?
    Why in my video is it on the 3 then

  4. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2019
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    In "Regular Time" back beats are on 2 & 4. In "Half Time" back beats are on beat 3. In "Double Time" back beats are on the up beats or the "&" of each beat.

    Most current hip hop "Trap", Future Bass, Reggae, and Dubstep are almost always in "Half Time". Which is why the BPM is so high at 155BPM. If you were to cut this in half and have it still feel the same pulse you would put the snares on 2 & 4.

    So, you are correct that the snares (claps) or backbeats are on beat 3.

    Hope this helped. If you have any further questions let me know.

    Keep makin' them BANGERS!


    Kyle Morris

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    USA: NorthEast Coast
    Posts
    2,909
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 269 Times in 244 Posts
    If you listen carefully, it is slightly out-of-sync with the track at various points. It might just be a sync issue (didn’t start exactly on-beat), or it might be that your tempo is close but incorrect (154, 156, 155.5, etc.).

    As long as you understand where the backbeat is— which is to say that you can find where the actual beat/pulse of the track is— you will be fine. Many people think that a track is “faster” than it is when they hear double-time parts such as shakers, tambourines, or other percussion, or the hi-hats and extra snare elements of trap type music that give it so much movement and forward momentum. But that is only because they haven’t understood sub-dividing beats and scope of tempo properly yet. You are well on your way now.

    If the snare is on 2&4, then you can figure out where 1&3 are, even if there’s a lot more activity and syncopation going on in the track.


    GJ
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






  6. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    USA: NorthEast Coast
    Posts
    2,909
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 269 Times in 244 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by BarryMcKockiner View Post
    The snares and claps aren’t always on the 2 and 4. Have you tried counting with the snare or clap on the 3?
    Generally they are in backbeat music (hence the name).

    GJ
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






  7. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    USA: NorthEast Coast
    Posts
    2,909
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 269 Times in 244 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by KyleMorris View Post
    In "Regular Time" back beats are on 2 & 4. In "Half Time" back beats are on beat 3. In "Double Time" back beats are on the up beats or the "&" of each beat.

    Most current hip hop "Trap", Future Bass, Reggae, and Dubstep are almost always in "Half Time". Which is why the BPM is so high at 155BPM. If you were to cut this in half and have it still feel the same pulse you would put the snares on 2 & 4.

    So, you are correct that the snares (claps) or backbeats are on beat 3.

    Hope this helped. If you have any further questions let me know.

    Keep makin' them BANGERS!


    Kyle Morris

    I would strongly disagree. Many people say this about reggae as well, but in my humble estimation, they are incorrect. It is still “1, 2, 3, 4,” with the backbeats on 2&4. The rest is ear candy.


    GJ
    Last edited by rhythmgj; 09-08-2019 at 10:55 PM. Reason: ...
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






  8. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Maybe this can help. This is TM88 breaking down the track and you can see it he has it set to 155bpm. So you’re correct with the snare and clap being on the 3.
    YouTube

  9. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    USA: NorthEast Coast
    Posts
    2,909
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 269 Times in 244 Posts
    S
    Quote Originally Posted by BarryMcKockiner View Post
    Maybe this can help. This is TM88 breaking down the track and you can see it he has it set to 155bpm. So you’re correct with the snare and clap being on the 3.
    YouTube
    While it might be correct to place the snare and/or claps on “beat 3” in your piano roll to achieve what is often called a half-time feel, I assure you that no professional musician would count the resulting rhythm with the emphasis on “3”— “1 2 *3* 4, 1 2 *3* 4;” they would simply count the rhythm as a normal backbeat— “1 + *2* + 3 + *4* +”... The reason things are done in “double time” is to make programming the percussive elements that propel the track, and are perceived as “faster,” easier, because otherwise you’d need to work with 32nd and 64th notes instead of 16ths. Again, this is really about sub-dividing and feeling the pulse properly. As a side-note, a.f.a.i.k., there is no such concept designated as “double time” or “half time” in traditional music theory; there _is_ however, the concept of cut time.


    Watch this video carefully, and listen to what he says about “double time.” It is just a rhythmic illusion, nothing more:

    YouTube



    GJ
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •