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Thread: Recording...Multitrack recorder versus computer

  1. #1
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    Recording...Multitrack recorder versus computer

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    Yo, I was going back and forth with the whole concept of recording via computer or multitrack recorder. The thing about computers that I don't like is how they tend tobe buggy ya know. Like crashes and viruses and whatnot. Cuz lets face it, we all ain't ballin' out of control and can buy/build 2 computers. One for strickly music and another for other use. So far I can get decent recording quality from my Triton Studio's CD burner, but one day that will have to quit so give me the pros and cons of each recording method please. Ez.
    "More money more problems, but it's worse when you're broke."
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    Hello,

    The thing about computers that I don't like is how they tend tobe buggy ya know.
    Computer OS are pretty stable now to worry about crashes. I wouldnt worry about crashes especially if your audio is on a separate drive. As for the viruses, just keep your virus software updated and you should be fine.

    The list is long to explain the differences between PC and Multi-track recording. In the end I think you will wind up spending more and get less if you go the multi-track route. Plus you will extrememly limit yourself.

    PC recording to me is much easier and compact. Everyhting is pretty much in one little box, and at your disposal.

    Cuz lets face it, we all ain't ballin' out of control and can buy/build 2 computers.
    Computers are not that expensive nowadays. You can build a monster Audio PC for a little over a $1000 (not including software). To use a 2nd computer to access the net, play games etc. you can build one for about $500. And those prices can drop if you buy second hand parts in some cases.

    It is nice but you dont need 2 computers.

    Hope this helps.
    I dont read long posts....

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    The least amount of money you're going to be paying for something that is comprable to a 3.2 Ghz computer with a 200GB hard drive running Cubase/Pro Tools/Sonar is 3-4 Thousand dollars plus you'll need to buy an exteranal device to house your recordings. For 4G's you can buy 2 powerful computers, decitate one to music and still buy all the hardware you need to control your DAW.

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    I agree with the last post.

    Buying a computer-based recording system is going to give you infinitely more flexibility with what you do with your files AFTER you record. We're talking effects plug-ins, time stretchers, pitch-changers, etc.

    I would go for a Macintosh, if your'e worried about stability. Macs rarely crash and have a cleaner operating system. This is, of course an opinion of mine, having worked on both Macs and PCs, but the choice is yours.

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    My computer is stable, you just gotta know what to and not to do. No cracked software, no p2p software, no porn sites, be cautions of email viruses, and general computer common sense. I also partition the bleep out of my drive and keep everything separated. Also back up to cdr and external hard drive.

    Computer multi tracking with software is so much more flexible. I have access to an yammaha aw, but i just cant get into using it. gotta stick with my cubase.
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    CPU based
    pro's
    mad flexibility, you can easily edit cut paste wav edit add effects.

    con's
    CPU's do crash, expensive plug in's
    upgrades you are forever going to be spindning cash on new upgrades an eventually a new CPU

    Multitrack recorder
    Pro's
    no load times, unit will last, I know people who have been using there roland 8 track for about 7/8 years, tell me one person doing that with a PC.
    with the newer multitracks, like the AW4416g and the VS2480 and a few others, with plug in support will whoop all expect the high in CPU's anyday.


    Con's
    no large screen's expect for the newer models. Not as flexible with the editing. Not as many tracks as the CPU recorders.

    But in the end it comes down to how you want to work. For the style of music I make(early to mid 90's hip hop). A CPU system doesn't make since. I can get everything I need with my AW16g. If I ever do sale a beat it will get sent to a mastering house anyway. So I would suggest going with a multitrack

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    Hmmmm, good feedbacks ya'll. I like the info. I am still twisted between the two ya know. Shyt! Decisions! I might go multi track first cuz if I go PC first and buy all the software too and then I don't like it then I gotta sell all of that shyt to get my money back and probably wont get all of it. If I get a multitrack recorder and I don't like that then I can just sell less pieces than a PC. Plus, maybe I am an ear person instead of an eye person. I dunno...keep the debate going on why I should go PC or Multi track. Thanks ya'll.
    "More money more problems, but it's worse when you're broke."
    Jason Phillips a.k.a. Jadakiss
    check out a few of my beats at http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page...?bandID=146770

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    Me agree with Bhunt. I have a VS2480 multitrack recorder hooked up with a flat screen monitor for easier editing, and well I could do just about everything on this baby from recording to mastering. I really don't use the pre-amps it has I just rather buy quality hardware pre-amps.(sorry I'm just ballin like that...hehehe.) I like making good old hip hop music sampling from my turntables! Whether it be software sequencers or hardware recorders they both have pros and cons. In my opinion 90% of computer plug ins are cheesy anyways with only about 10% being really good but those are the ones that cost alot of dough! Point blank if you got the money and you serious about making music get yourself a hardware recorder and learn it! Besides,Hardware also has a distinct sound it adds to music that computers have yet to imitate perfectly.

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    Originally posted by laconic
    I agree with the last post.

    Buying a computer-based recording system is going to give you infinitely more flexibility with what you do with your files AFTER you record. We're talking effects plug-ins, time stretchers, pitch-changers, etc.

    I would go for a Macintosh, if your'e worried about stability. Macs rarely crash and have a cleaner operating system. This is, of course an opinion of mine, having worked on both Macs and PCs, but the choice is yours.
    Thats a real good point to make. I wish I would've worked with a mac, but my PC is ok. As for crashing goes, most new (PC's) have a re-boot disk. If you are a PC user its important to keep files/software on a disk so in case it does go you can re-boot and still have everything. With programs like Sony's ACID, you can purchase the program online from the official website for download paying a couple of bucks less than the box would cost you. If somehow the PC crashes I believe, you can download it again if you have your serial number. And (for the lazy who asks stupid simple uestions) most software manufacturers have the manual alone for sale. It is a pain in the ass to do all that and you can go about it a different way, I'm sure, but it would work for PC users.

    -Geoffrey

  10. #10
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    I'd say go with the PC, Its the most cost effective and flexible solution. And these days if you set up your pc properly stability won't be an issue. PC instability is usally a result of the pc not being configured properly, h!tty software or other issues that can be prevented and are the result of the user and not somthing inherant to computers. It's nice to have a pc just for music but there are ways you can imitate having two, like having a dual boot set up. This is as simple as partitioning your hard drive and installing a operating system. You tweak one for music and the other for everything else. through in a second hard drive just for recording and you solid. If your working with limited money the pc is the choice to go with.

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