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Thread: Multitracking

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    Multitracking

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    could someone please explain to me how multitracking with a console works.i like to create a studio where i can change the sound of the tracks just by changing the knobs on the console. i've been looking at a Behringer MX9000 but how does the sound get to the computer if an entire band is playing live?

    Go slow im a neeewwwwbie

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    You have a big multichannel interface for the computer, typically 8 or 16 channels. This is either connected to the channel "tape" inserts or to the busses for recording.
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    so could someone give me a typical list of equipment and how its connected?

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    Originally posted by lioness_studios
    i've been looking at a Behringer MX9000 but how does the sound get to the computer if an entire band is playing live?
    You would of course patch all your instruments into the channel strips on the mixer. Then you would route a 2 track signal into your computers sound card***

    The only downfall is that depending on the soundcards input you will only be able to record X amount of tracks at one time. In this case you could set-up the band, and mix it using the EQ on the mixer before you print it to the computer.

    ***you would need a computer program like Cubase, Sonar to be able to record the audio into the computer.
    I dont read long posts....

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    Let's say you want to record a full band; drums, bass, guitarist and vocals. You first have the mics, various kinds for various jobs. These mics will usually use XLR to XLR cables to connect them to the mixing desk's mic preamps.

    The desk has 2 main volume controls, the channel gain knob at the top and then the channel fader at the bottom. In between are various EQ, FX and AUX (auxiliary send) channels.

    Usually when recording you aim to get the best sound possible using correct mic placement. Sometimes you may have to tweak the EQ a little or add a small amount of gentle compression - but once these tweaks are recorded they can't be undone without the band replaying the whole song again, so it's usual to add effects AFTER to the playback from tape or your PC.

    The desk needs to have multiple channel outputs that you then connect to your multichannel soundcard via the apropriate cables - this varies from model to model. Some newer desks use a multichannel digital output direct to your PC via USB2 or Firewire - such as the new Mackie Onyx range.

    On the PC you need some kind of multichannel audio sequencer package to record and then edit the song. Examples are: Cubase, Sonar, Pro Tools or Logic (for Macs). Using this software you'll record the seperate instruments to individual channels. You can then manipulate the tracks using EQ and other effects and dynamics processors.

    Ultimately when you're happy with how the song sounds you mix it down to a final stereo file, typically a high quality (24 bit) wav file. This is then mastered to tweak it and make it sound perfect.

    MM

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    ok that part i understand i can do that. what i dont understand is this. i recently took my band to a studio to record and the engineer was altering the sound ON THE DESK after it had been recorded. how is this possible? surely a desk is only one way? i.e instruments to computer?

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    right ok so correct me if im wrong.

    use a behringer MX9000 as the console. using the XLRs

    use this Motu sound card and connect the channel outs from the mixer to the inputs on the card. THEN plug the outputs from the card into the lineins on the mixer (the mixer can switch between XLR and lines with a switch). then plug the mixers main stereo out into a studio amp and a cd recorder. providing i record all the original signals completely dry wud that be a good setup?

    http://www.guitarampkeyboard.com/htm/pic/9951.jpg

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    Originally posted by lioness_studios
    ok that part i understand i can do that. what i dont understand is this. i recently took my band to a studio to record and the engineer was altering the sound ON THE DESK after it had been recorded. how is this possible? surely a desk is only one way? i.e instruments to computer?
    No, a desk is anyway you want to hook it up. You record things through it as i explained above. You then can tweak things on the playback, as i also explained above. On playback the computer or HD recorder plays all channels out via it's multiple outputs to the desks mulitple tape inputs where you can then make tweaks to the sound.

    I've no idea what a behringer MX9000 is, so can't help you there.

    MM

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