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Thread: Is living in an old house is good or bad for acoustics? Any questions? How do I test

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    Is living in an old house is good or bad for acoustics? Any questions? How do I test

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    Should I record myself using a Sine Wave oscillator and tell you when I can hear certain frequencies after you have told me how to do it? I think I know how and I have tested it and it seems fine.

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    What do you mean by an "old house?" Castle? Early 1900's? Mid-Century Modern? 1980's?


    GJ
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






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    Very old house. 1600s. It has been modernised quite a bit. There are still beams here (of course) and an extension has been added. There has been a full redoing to the whole house, but cause it is listed the materials used aren't exactly sound proof. In sound acoustics i am not sure if the beams do a good job at that. I have done a test and it seems fine, but i would still like an answer.
    Last edited by jayboy213; 04-28-2019 at 09:33 AM.

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    Non-acoustic (but important!) factor to check on = electrical wiring...

    As to your specific question, it depends on the shape and make up of the rooms you’ll be recording and mixing in, the equipment you use, and what treatment (if any) and/or furniture is present. There is nothing inherently wrong with exposed ceiling beams; they might actually help. But as with any artistic craftlike endeavor— “it depends.”

    If you’ve already got the gear, do some test recordings. Use your ears and your hands (clapping) to find live, dead, and possibly problematic areas, before digging into test tones and pink noise. Play some music in the space— do you hear anything jump out at you? (Exagerated/boomy/corner-loaded bass, funky treble ringing or unwanted echo/reverb?)

    Here are some articles from Sound on Sound Magazine (a great resource) regarding rooms and treatment. There’s lots more on the Web (search up and read).

    ”Practice and Enjoy,” as they say...

    Studio SOS Guide To Monitoring & Acoustic Treatment |

    A Beginner's Guide To Acoustic Treatment |

    Acoustic Treatment | Sound On Sound


    GJ
    Last edited by rhythmgj; 04-28-2019 at 01:41 PM. Reason: Auto Correct has tried to drive me to despair...
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






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    Thanks for this.

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    I forgot to mention because of the age of this house my walls aren't straight and the ceiling corners are really weirdly shaped as if the roof was built as part of the room so putting bass traps in the ceiling corners might be tricky. I will buy some bass traps and foam absorbers and all sorts and see if the problems persist. Yes I have tested with clapping and it seems it is the corners in some areas, but I will clap while I am putting the material up so I can see at the time. Btw I have had my studio room for nearly a year now and never put any acoustic treatment up.

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