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Thread: Digital or Analog Mixers

  1. #1
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    Digital or Analog Mixers

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    I'm in the market to buy a 24 trk mixer, and I would like to know which should, I buy digital or analog? And what brand is better, I have a budget of $2,400. I basically do hip-hop, R & B and Alternative

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    What is your setup? Do you work off a computer? What is your kit list? Do you have a lot of hardware efx and dynamics? These are important issues and the more information you give us the better the advice will be.

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    Samplecraze is on the money.
    I'll give you a picture of what I have...

    I use Pro Tols w/ a Digi001 and MPC3000 and Korg T3 ansd two other old skool hardware samplers. For a mixer, I use a Yamaha 01v. It's a digital mixer and it is connected to the Digi001 via an ADAT connection.

    I used to have an analog Mackie mixer. I upgraded thinking I would get one thing. It changed my whole set-up, fortunately for the better. But change is something to think about and plan ahead on. Otherwise, you'll spend hours pissed and regrouping.

    Peace.
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    contact me at homershines@yahoo.c-o-m

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    I wanted to give digital a shot so I ended up getting an 02r.

    At first, I was thinking that I should have went for another analog mixer for simplicity since I had a tought time with the console for the first few weeks. Partly because I didn't have a lot of time to mess around with it at the time also.

    Once I got the hang of the mixer, I enjoyed the flexibility and what I could do just with that. Since I don't use a lot of outboard effects, what I have in the 02r (some reverb/chorus/others, compression, and eq) usually does me pretty well.

    Now that I can use the mixer like nothing, I enjoy working with digital even more. I would still consider a great analog board if I found one at a good price though.

    It's hard for me to recommend between digital or analog generally. They both have their advantages and shortcomings. You would really have to try it out on your own.

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    whats the diff between digital n analouge?
    [img]http://sdp.seyedaddy.com/images/sd.jpg[/img]
    music if life... everyrthing else is just details

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    O2R's are really cheap at the moment as everyone is moving to 96kHz sample rates. Grab one and an adat card for your computer and thats all you'll need for mixer and audio interface
    Last edited by mungo; 04-26-2004 at 04:47 PM.
    [b][url=http://home.netspeed.com.au/aistorm/]Sync˛ and Roland TR606 Mods[/url][/b]

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    Originally posted by seye
    whats the diff between digital n analouge?
    Digital transfer datas with 0's and 1's. If it's stored in your computer or even other devices such as minidisks, cd's, dats, etc... it's digital. Analog signals are electromagnitec signals. Analog signals are used by tapes, many video cameras, home phones, etc...

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    hmm... what i meant was...

    whats the diff between a analoge and digital mixer.
    [img]http://sdp.seyedaddy.com/images/sd.jpg[/img]
    music if life... everyrthing else is just details

  9. #9
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    While analog mixers can route pretty well, digital mixers allow for slightly more flexibility in routing.

    Many digital mixers also have onboard effects. Some are good, some are crap, so it really depends. High-end analog mixers provide automation, but most digital mixers can automate mixes.

    The biggest difference comes from the dynamics. Analog signal usually have a lot of headroom. This means that your signal can be pretty hot and your signal will not clip. Although analog does clip also, it will not sound as bad/rough as digital will sound. In digital, when measuring audio levels, anything above 0db will clip.

    Analog will often be better at capturing audio subtleties also and analog circuits can make audio sound warmer.

    In digital, you are also sonically limited by the quality of you converters, whether going analog to digital or digital to analog. In analog, you are limited by the way that the board was built and the components used.

    When doing transfers, digital transfers will not deteriorate. Other than jitter, since digital signals are 0's and 1's, your data will remain the same. In analog, it is impossible to avoid any additional noise being introduced into your audio. While high-end board and mid-end boards are pretty quiet and the difference may not be audible, there will be a difference.

    And on and on... this is a fairly big subject. Which is also why people debate on this so much. I didn't even go into bitrates and sample rates. I'll leave it as that.

  10. #10
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    The biggest difference comes from the dynamics. Analog signal usually have a lot of headroom. This means that your signal can be pretty hot and your signal will not clip. Although analog does clip also, it will not sound as bad/rough as digital will sound. In digital, when measuring audio levels, anything above 0db will clip.
    Yeah there is the big downside of digital, a good analog desk will have 120dB of clean signal and then another 12-20dB of useable distortion whereas the digital will have the 120dB (or even more) and then nothing. Its just a matter of getting used to a "new" gain structure for the digital consoles.

    The big advantage you missed is that most digital consoles have compressor/limiter/multi dynamics and fully parametric/switchable HP/LP EQ's on every channel, all with full recall.
    [b][url=http://home.netspeed.com.au/aistorm/]Sync˛ and Roland TR606 Mods[/url][/b]

    [url=http://www.mp3.com.au/RythmEmulator/]Grab My tracks here[/url]

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