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Thread: Building a studio -> ROOM measurements (Looking for help)

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    Building a studio -> ROOM measurements (Looking for help)

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    Hey guys, I decided to build a home studio at my place, so now I am looking for a proper room to choose. This one is one of my basement rooms and here you have little description of it:

    Lenght - 6,40 MWidth - 4 MHeight - 2,16 M

    So my first question is, is height not too small? I am afraid 2,16 is not enough height for the sound waves to travel properly, so I think I will end up with not proper sound coming out of the monitors, am I right? Or maybe the height will not be a problem? I don't know too much about acoustics so I would like to ask for Your help FP users!

    Here is a quick paint made pic for You to see how the room looks like

    studio-pic-jpg
    Last edited by kmano; 10-08-2012 at 03:48 AM.

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    Yeah, 7'1" seems a little low, but I've seen worse proposed right here at fp.

    Comparing your Rooms dimension ratios with the three Sepmeyer/Winer Ratios for optimum small room size, we see that

    Height R Width R Length R Height Width Length Volume
    Your Room 1.00 1.85 3.01 2.16 4.00 6.50 56.16
    S/W 1 1.00 1.14 1.39 2.16 2.46 3.02 16.05
    S/W 2 1.00 1.28 1.54 2.16 2.77 3.33 19.92
    S/W 3 1.00 1.66 2.33 2.16 3.59 5.03 39.01

    Your room is on the large size compared to the optimum for the given height in terms of each of the three ratios. This gives you wiggle room in creating an optimised treatment for the room, that would be hard to get otherwise. I'd personally go qwith S/W 3 as the room dimensions to work towards

    Given this, length and width seem ok

    Here is a table of the first 10 harmonics of the axial resonance frequencies (H/W/L) The sequence numbers, and the numbers below the dimensions, refer to the harmonic of the base resonant freq for that dimension, e.g. 0 0 1 means the first or base axial resonant freq for length:
    H W L Seq F (Hz) Type Diff (Hz)
    0 0 1 0 0 1 26.49 Axial Length 26.49
    0 1 0 0 1 0 43.06 Axial Width 16.58
    0 0 2 0 0 2 52.98 Axial Length 9.91
    0 0 3 0 0 3 79.47 Axial Length 26.49
    1 0 0 1 0 0 79.69 Axial Height 0.22
    0 2 0 0 2 0 86.13 Axial Width 6.44
    0 0 4 0 0 4 105.95 Axial Length 19.83
    0 3 0 0 3 0 129.19 Axial Width 23.24
    0 0 5 0 0 5 132.44 Axial Length 3.25
    0 0 6 0 0 6 158.93 Axial Length 26.49
    2 0 0 2 0 0 159.38 Axial Height 0.45
    0 4 0 0 4 0 172.26 Axial Width 12.88
    0 0 7 0 0 7 185.42 Axial Length 13.16
    0 0 8 0 0 8 211.91 Axial Length 26.49
    0 5 0 0 5 0 215.32 Axial Width 3.41
    0 0 9 0 0 9 238.40 Axial Length 23.08
    3 0 0 3 0 0 239.07 Axial Height 0.67
    0 6 0 0 6 0 258.38 Axial Width 19.32
    0 0 10 0 0 10 264.89 Axial Length 6.50
    0 7 0 0 7 0 301.45 Axial Width 36.56
    4 0 0 4 0 0 318.76 Axial Height 17.31
    0 8 0 0 8 0 344.51 Axial Width 25.75
    0 9 0 0 9 0 387.58 Axial Width 43.06
    5 0 0 5 0 0 398.45 Axial Height 10.87
    0 10 0 0 10 0 430.64 Axial Width 32.19
    6 0 0 6 0 0 478.14 Axial Height 47.50
    7 0 0 7 0 0 557.83 Axial Height 79.69
    8 0 0 8 0 0 637.52 Axial Height 79.69
    9 0 0 9 0 0 717.21 Axial Height 79.69
    10 0 0 10 0 0 796.90 Axial Height 79.69

    The image shows the first 10 axial resonances for each dimension arranged to match the above table:



    these would be a starting point for treatment

    see John L Sayers Recording and Acoustics manual for more details on how to design and build appropriate room treatments....
    Last edited by bandcoach; 10-08-2012 at 09:21 AM.
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    BUMP! No one knows? Im sure a lot of You have that knowledge..

    Bandcoach, I know You are the one to save me.

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    That room has a good amount of space and would definitely be workable. Yes, the height being low could make some matters worse but if you place some panels on the ceiling you should be able to get rid of comb filtering effects from those reflections.

    If you do use the room in that picture..... You will definitely need some bass trapping in the room. I would start with first reflection points, and as much corner area as you can cover. The rear wall is typically quite boomy in most rooms as well, so trapping is usually effective back there. The position you have laid out for the desk and monitors is right where I would put them too - you should be fine there.

    gikacoustics.com/education.html - You can check this out to get the basic ideas behind acoustics in your studio room - and why, where, what kind, and how treatment is important.
    Alexander Reynolds
    GIK Acoustics USA (770) 986 2789 | GIK Acoustics Europe +44 (0) 20 7558 8976 (UK)

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    Thanks to BC and to GIK Acoustics! I will now study a bit more about it and try to make the best out of it. Thank You guys very much again!

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    Bandcoach & GIK Acoustics have given you a truckload of info to work with there. Yes, a higher ceiling is better for tracking, but many control rooms have pretty low ceilings, and as mentioned, there have been many places with worse dimensions. The big deals are proper room treatment (including bass trapping, but also catching echoes and high-end cheese), and trying to avoid parallel walls, so if you can do any actual construction in the room, you may want to look at changing angles with some drywall, or treating the room with "movable walls" like wall-hangings/blankets, etc. Also, the more irregular patterns that you can introduce to diffuse sounds bouncing around, the better, so bookshelves and furniture can help. The problem is that your room is pretty small already, so planning your layout to have maximum use of the space will be critical. Also, in general for tracking rooms, a "hard floor, soft ceiling" is considered best, but in less than perfect rooms (and all of us are working in less than perfect rooms, unless your place was purpose-built by professional as a studio), adding carpet and area rugs can help a lot too.

    GJ
    Last edited by rhythmgj; 10-09-2012 at 10:39 AM.

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    Just a little co-signing to what everybody else said. My room has a low ceiling, so I have clouds in specific points, as well as traps and absorbers in the main reflection points. Its a little bass heavy when u stand, but sitting in the main listening spot is pretty flat. I went the DIY route and got most of my material from here Acoustic Panels by ATS Acoustics (no offense GIK). I used diff grades of rockwool (cheaper than owens), and just built the frames and put burlap to cover them(summer project). Here's another site with good info: RealTraps - Home. Also, GS has a gang of info sound treatment. my 2 cents

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    Quote Originally Posted by rhythmgj View Post
    Also, the more irregular patterns that you can introduce to diffuse sounds bouncing around, the better, so bookshelves and furniture can help.
    Just wanted to add that while bookshelves and furniture can break up flutter echo, it won't really diffuse. Diffusion isn't just random, it is calculated to give even returns throughout the frequency spectrum. And though putting things in the room to break up some echoes can help, I wouldn't suggest putting things in the room you don't need in there. Broadband absorption would be more effective.
    Alexander Reynolds
    GIK Acoustics USA (770) 986 2789 | GIK Acoustics Europe +44 (0) 20 7558 8976 (UK)

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    Disagree. Diffusion is diffusion, whether it is perfect or not. It is the same as Simon Phillips putting a paint can in each bass drum to make them easier to mike. It does not give the bass drum perfect frequncy response, but it helps...

    That being said, I'm not advocating stuffing extra furniture in the control room or adding anything that's not needed, or especially using those things in lieu of proper treatment; just that they can help and be part of the solution, and functional as well.

    GJ

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    Quote Originally Posted by rhythmgj View Post
    Disagree. Diffusion is diffusion, whether it is perfect or not. It is the same as Simon Phillips putting a paint can in each bass drum to make them easier to mike.
    Sorry, but no, that is not true. You aren't disagreeing with me mind you, you are disagreeing with the meaning of the word. You are thinking of the term "scattering" which is not nearly "diffusion" at all. Scattering just suggests changing the path of an audio signal - which an object in the way (like furniture, or a paint can) could provide. Diffusion is evenly scattering the sound in time, phase, and intensity of sound waves for a certain frequency band. You can check out our article we have on diffusion here: gikacoustics.com/education_diffusion.html

    Here's a quote from the page that better summarizes what I'm trying to say:

    There are a great many myths about ‘home brew’ ways to provide diffusion. Most do not work at all and many work poorly or only over a very narrow range of frequencies. Let’s take a look at one – a bookcase with books set at randomly varying depths.
    First of all books, if anything, will be more absorptive than reflective at any but the highest frequencies. Second, random depths do not generate random reflections over a predictable and controllable area. The width, height, spacing, and pattern of the wells of a diffusor are carefully calculated to make sure they generate a smooth and even scattering of the waves over a 180 degree angle. Third, without this carefully calculated spacing, we can cause frequency related aberrations due to constructive and destructive wave interactions from various reflections. We’re in effect getting very little of the benefit of a diffusor while creating more issues in the frequency response.
    Alexander Reynolds
    GIK Acoustics USA (770) 986 2789 | GIK Acoustics Europe +44 (0) 20 7558 8976 (UK)

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