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Thread: How much latency does a linear EQ provide?

  1. #1
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    How much latency does a linear EQ provide?

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    beyond what my ears can pick up.......


    is there a way to find out how much latency a linear phase EQ comes with?


    or are there any good plugins to chain with an EQ or EQ's that might actually display this?


    or is there a general number and consensus among the top digital equalizers such as fab filter pro q 2 or izototope ozone 7?


    thanks


    - Jake

  2. #2
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    Why are you concerning about this?

    Any good DAW provides plugin delay compensation.

    In Cubase's Plugin Manager you can readout the delay in samples.

    If you like to test it, take a spikey signal and render the output.
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  3. #3
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    well in Logic Pro X thats just it..

    it's ONLY a latency plugin compensation on off switch.. nothing else.

    I'm honestly just a control freak and I'm trying to find absolute perfection with my sound. I'm trying to find a plugin or a tool where you can just hover over the latency of each individual track. and know exactly what plugins introduce it and what ones dont.

    like a cpu meter but for individual tracks. cause with my CPU usage meter in logic pro x i can fearlessly 4x oversample and throw on 5 different instances of vitamin on a sets of buses. while being able to keep and eye on my CPU meter almost making logic feel a little more limitless in a way.

    if we had that type of meter we could fearlessly start throwing linear phase equalization every which way. in attempts to minimize any chance of the smallest amount of distortion. cause F*** smart phone speakers amirite ?

  4. #4
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    The only time I'd personally worry (or even care) about latency is if it became audible.

    If I hit a key/pad and the sound comes out without any audible delay then I don't have a latency problem.
    I'm all about that boombap.

  5. #5
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    linear is very low latency. I wouldn't be too worried. If you can HONESTLY hear ANY difference with it on and off all I can say is you're superhuman.

    You could turn on low latency mode during recording and it'll mute/disable any inserts with a higher latency. Not sure how sensitive it is and what it gauges though.. it WOULD be nice to know just how much latency is being introduced per insert. Hm.
    “It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.”

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    I think you're confusing latency with performance. I suspect you are thinking of this like a video game or something.

    Latency, with respect to DAWs, means the number of samples a plugin needs to keep in memory to be able to perform it's task. Or how many samples out of sync the output is with the input.

    For example... for a gain plugin all you have to do is multiply the current sample by a factor. So latency is nothing. Every output needs only the current input. Or output n corresponds to input n.

    In Linear Phrase EQ overcomes the phase distortion created by filters but does that by working on a chunk of audio rather than one sample at a time. Some compressors have look-ahead modes. These too need to keep a buffer in memory for the next, say, 1 ms of samples. This means that the plugin can't give you an 'answer for a give sample until after it has collection more samples. So output n correspond to input n-5 (with 5 sample latency). The total number of samples it has to collect is it's latency. DAWs can take this latency into account and shunt all the samples back in sync with all the other pugins.

    That is nothing to do with performance (except that all that shunting presumably uses buffering which takes up RAM and CPU). If the CPU is maxed out then your DAW can't produce sample data in reatime and you get drop-outs.

    It does, however, impact input performance. More latency makes playing stuff in a pain.
    Last edited by MarcDHall; 11-24-2016 at 07:02 AM.

  7. #7
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    I agree that it does seem you want a CPU meter for each of your plugins and not a latency meter. There's nothing like that out there.

  8. #8
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    REAPER offers a CPU metering per track.
    Mastering 2 € per minute - 7/24/365 - 1 Hour turnaround - Free test - Try now
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