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Thread: Bass mixing problems

  1. #1
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    Bass mixing problems

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    So i have a track I'm working on genre (G-Funk) i have recorded bass that i recorded in a professional studio with a AKG D112 with a bass amp. The recording is very clear but when I'm mixing it with my track the bass just sounds really muddy. Does anyone know a good bass mix chain i could use or any ideas on how to get a perfect balance?
    - J

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    Uhm yeah, the D112 is a typical bass DRUM mic. There are way better mics for the job.
    What kind of professional studio is that supposed to be?

    You should post a few samples, otherwise it is only guessing.
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    I usually start with notching out anywhere from 180 to 260 hz to remove mud. I would think that that is all that is necessary, since I am sure you are referring to muddy frequencies. I hope that this helps.
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  6. #4
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    Uni

    Its the studio i use in my university, a full live room room all acoustically treated, running with pro tools a toft desk and some outboard gear. Il try and get some samples as soon as.

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    i will try that man and see if it makes a difference thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by RedJRecords View Post
    i will try that man and see if it makes a difference thanks
    Also side chain compress so that other frequencies in the low end stay away, for instance vocals. Also ensure you have the right rms and peak levels across the frequency range of the bass so that the bass line stays set and it hence becomes easier to balance it to have the right volume level in the mix. (this you can to some degree fix by tuning the acoustics of the recording room and the bass tracking configuration) Pay attention to the volume of the bass tones on various chords and how easily the bass line is perceived. Do this work during recording so that you have to do less during mixing.
    Last edited by DarkRed; 03-05-2017 at 12:17 AM.

  9. #7
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    also try getting rid of the frequencies below the sub (>30hz) or record a separate sub. it might be that there are some muddy frequencies there because no room is perfect
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    You didn't happen to record a DI as well did you? The best I can recommend without hearing it is to try to EQ to clean up the mud and add some distortion to get some higher harmonics. This might add some clarity to it.

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