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Thread: Drumz question

  1. #1
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    Drumz question

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    Hi
    I have one question that I cant figure out with. It`s drums.
    When we create a project - how drums should be ? Mono, stereo, binaural pan ?
    I watched a tons of different video, but still cant figure it out.
    For example, when I create a kick, transpose chanel to binaural pan and move the kick very close to the center of pan - it sounds louder, punchier, but quality of sound become strange in a bad way.
    Please, can you tell me - how drums is supose to sound for now days ?
    Thanks!

    P.S. sorry for grammatics

  2. #2
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    Drums are generally in stereo, but that means the whole drum track. NOT each individual part of the kit, such as bass, snare, hats, etc.

    What this means is that drums are panned across the stereo field in such a way as to replicate listening to a live kit. The kick and snare are usually close to center (some people say “center,” but if there is a lead vocal, rap, or an instrumental lead or solo, I want kick and snare slightly off center, to feature that voice or lead instrument). Then the hats, cymbals, and drums are panned accordingly either 1) “Listener’s Perspective”— which means from right to left, assuming a right-handed kit, or 2) “Drummer’s Perspective,” which would have toms and such panned opposite (from left to right, assuming a right -handed kit, which would put the listener “inside the drums,” or, in the drummer’s seat).

    In this day and age, with EDM and Trap music, and multiple kicks, snares, and hi-hats on any given mix, it’s kind of anything goes... BUT, make sure that your panning, EQ, and effects don’t create “mud” (a terrible, un-focused sound), or undercut intelligibility. The problem you are having with the binaural effect is... well, it’s somewhat complicated to spend more verbiage on, but a very, very important rule-of-thumb is, “If you don’t know what ‘Binaural’ means, don’t use it.”

    Hope that helps...


    GJ
    Gregg Juke
    Nocturnal Productions
    The Sonic Vault Recording Studio
    Drum! Magazine Contributor






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