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Thread: Dont know what to do

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by rhythmgj View Post
    You will be ok. My father was a tank commander. Wear your ear protection!


    GJ
    Oh cool ^^
    Last edited by Kfs743; 03-15-2019 at 02:11 AM.

  2. #12
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    My advice would be to get a hold of some good old-fashion books to read, covering important theory related to the music production process. Believe me, there is a lot of theory to learn that will greatly benefit you when you get back to having access to the software you'll use to actually do some production!

    Some of the best books I've read on these subjects include:


    • Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio by Mike Senior
    • The Mixing Engineer's Handbook
    • Music Theory For Computer Musicians


    Reading books might not be the most exiting thing to do, but if you're interested in getting good at what you do, it's worth it!

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  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by cseder View Post
    My advice would be to get a hold of some good old-fashion books to read, covering important theory related to the music production process. Believe me, there is a lot of theory to learn that will greatly benefit you when you get back to having access to the software you'll use to actually do some production!

    Some of the best books I've read on these subjects include:


    • Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio by Mike Senior
    • The Mixing Engineer's Handbook
    • Music Theory For Computer Musicians


    Reading books might not be the most exiting thing to do, but if you're interested in getting good at what you do, it's worth it!
    Hey and thank you very much for your help!
    Where can i get these books?

  5. #14
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    Just google the titles, and you'll get places to purchase according to where you live!
    Amazon is always your friend. They have all the titles I believe.

  6. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by cseder View Post
    Just google the titles, and you'll get places to purchase according to where you live!
    Amazon is always your friend. They have all the titles I believe.
    Ok thank you very much
    Last edited by Kfs743; 03-18-2019 at 08:37 AM.

  7. #16
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    Just being overly helpful:

    Music Theory For Computer Musicians:
    Music Theory for Computer Musicians: Michael Hewitt: 8580001270159: Amazon.com: Books
    The Mixing Engineer's Handbook - Fourth Edition: The Mixing Engineer's Handbook: Fourth Edition: Bobby Owsinski: 9780988839182: Amazon.com: Books
    Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio 2nd Edition: Amazon.com: Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio (Sound On Sound Presents...) eBook: Mike Senior: Kindle Store

    Resource site with tons of material for the last one: Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio (Cambridge Music Technology)

    Also, if you want to learn how to create your own synth patches, and not just be a "preset guy", I'd recommend reading up on the basics of synthesis (subtractive, FM, wavetable etc), so that no matter what synth you use you can always make a killer patch that sounds awesome.

    The following books are pretty old, but still golden and relevant when it comes to listening to a sound and re-creating it using software synths.
    I've read both and they're not very hard to get through, and if you're allowed to bring an iPad or a eBook reader, you can get these very cheap on the Books Store on iOS or Mac or through Amazon as a Kindle Edition for around $3-4 per book:

    How to Make a Noise: Analog Synthesis Amazon.com: How to Make a Noise: Analog Synthesis eBook: Simon Cann: Books
    How to Make a Noise: Frequency Modulation Synthesis: http://tinyurl.com/y4b5fhys


    Also used copies in paper form sells for around $4.

    Then when you've read these you go get this one, and do all the exercises, recreating all the sounds in your synth of choice:

    Keyboard Presents: Steal This Sound https://www.amazon.com/Keyboard-Pres.../dp/B00IISACL8

    Also an old book from 2011, but the exercises are still just as relevant.

    Good Luck!

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  9. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by cseder View Post
    Just being overly helpful:

    Music Theory For Computer Musicians:
    Music Theory for Computer Musicians: Michael Hewitt: 8580001270159: Amazon.com: Books
    The Mixing Engineer's Handbook - Fourth Edition: The Mixing Engineer's Handbook: Fourth Edition: Bobby Owsinski: 9780988839182: Amazon.com: Books
    Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio 2nd Edition: Amazon.com: Mixing Secrets for the Small Studio (Sound On Sound Presents...) eBook: Mike Senior: Kindle Store

    Resource site with tons of material for the last one: Mixing Secrets For The Small Studio (Cambridge Music Technology)

    Also, if you want to learn how to create your own synth patches, and not just be a "preset guy", I'd recommend reading up on the basics of synthesis (subtractive, FM, wavetable etc), so that no matter what synth you use you can always make a killer patch that sounds awesome.

    The following books are pretty old, but still golden and relevant when it comes to listening to a sound and re-creating it using software synths.
    I've read both and they're not very hard to get through, and if you're allowed to bring an iPad or a eBook reader, you can get these very cheap on the Books Store on iOS or Mac or through Amazon as a Kindle Edition for around $3-4 per book:

    How to Make a Noise: Analog Synthesis Amazon.com: How to Make a Noise: Analog Synthesis eBook: Simon Cann: Books
    How to Make a Noise: Frequency Modulation Synthesis: http://tinyurl.com/y4b5fhys


    Also used copies in paper form sells for around $4.

    Then when you've read these you go get this one, and do all the exercises, recreating all the sounds in your synth of choice:

    Keyboard Presents: Steal This Sound https://www.amazon.com/Keyboard-Pres.../dp/B00IISACL8

    Also an old book from 2011, but the exercises are still just as relevant.

    Good Luck!
    Oh wow thank you
    I have another question
    My dream is to be a dj like marshmello/martin garrix/mesto/etc..
    I am 18 and i started 1.5 months ago to learn music production(and i have just the basics of usint dj controller). Is it too late for me? Or that i still have a chance to be like them(not at the top but at leasr a successful one XD )

  10. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kfs743 View Post
    Oh wow thank you
    I have another question
    My dream is to be a dj like marshmello/martin garrix/mesto/etc..
    I am 18 and i started 1.5 months ago to learn music production(and i have just the basics of usint dj controller). Is it too late for me? Or that i still have a chance to be like them(not at the top but at leasr a successful one XD )
    Hey, you're just a kid. Not too late in any way. Dedication and hard work will get you anywhere you want to go, and don't forget to network and get your stuff out there.
    Social media like Instagram and Twitter is important and SoundCloud and BeatStars.com are great places to start uploading your stuff when you get to that point.

    If you only choose ONE of the first three books, then I personally think it should be: The Mixing Engineer's Handbook - Fourth Edition.
    It has a wealth of useful information and interviews with mixers like Jimmy Douglass (Snoop Dog, Jay-Z, Ludacris, Missy Elliott etc), John Gass (Usher, Babyface etc), Andrew Scheps (Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Justin Timberlake etc) and many other influential people sharing their tips and tricks.

    Even if live performance / DJ'ing is your primary goal, mixing is an essential skill, and an important stepping-stone on the path to create your own music.

  11. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by cseder View Post
    Hey, you're just a kid. Not too late in any way. Dedication and hard work will get you anywhere you want to go, and don't forget to network and get your stuff out there.
    Social media like Instagram and Twitter is important and SoundCloud and BeatStars.com are great places to start uploading your stuff when you get to that point.

    If you only choose ONE of the first three books, then I personally think it should be: The Mixing Engineer's Handbook - Fourth Edition.
    It has a wealth of useful information and interviews with mixers like Jimmy Douglass (Snoop Dog, Jay-Z, Ludacris, Missy Elliott etc), John Gass (Usher, Babyface etc), Andrew Scheps (Red Hot Chilli Peppers, Justin Timberlake etc) and many other influential people sharing their tips and tricks.

    Even if live performance / DJ'ing is your primary goal, mixing is an essential skill, and an important stepping-stone on the path to create your own music.
    I saw that the book is 40$. Is it worth the money?
    My English level is not so high, I dont speak English at my country, is it still worth the buying? Can i still understand everything?
    P.s thank you for your help
    Last edited by Kfs743; 03-18-2019 at 03:50 PM.

  12. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kfs743 View Post
    I saw that the book is 50$. Is it worth the money?
    My English level is not so high, I dont speak English at my country, is it still worth the buying? Can i still understand everything?
    P.s thank you for your help
    Yeah, I guess the paper format is quite expensive. If you're allowed to bring an eBook reader, an iPad or something, I paid around $25 for it as an eBook. If you search the darker corners of the web, you'll probably find it as a torrent or something, not that I encourage this, but just mentioning it if it's a last-resort kinda thing and money is stopping you from pursuing your passion and all...
    Maybe you can get it used on Amazon. Depending on where you live the shipping might get expensive though...

    Still think it's worth it, but hey, there might be cheaper books out there that covers much of the same stuff, just don't know from personal experience. I learned a lot from that book at least.
    You might want to go for the books on synth sounds first, they come much cheaper. Learning to create great sounding synth patches is also a very important skill.
    I think you'll be able to understand these books, even though you're not a native English speaker, but, they are books covering sound engineering topics, so it's not like reading a magazine article...

    Both books on mixing are pretty expensive, but consider it an investment in your future.

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