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Thread: African Music you never heard before

  1. #1
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    African Music you never heard before

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    Hi, I don't know if this is the right section, but since this is a crowded forum I want to show you the African music I love more and the people that perform it.

    This is music from the Western Sahel
    (ex Mali and Songhai Empire) Sahel is the "shore" of the big and hot see called Sahara

    Western Sahelian People






    Mandinka, Soninka, Hausa, Fulani, etc etc

    Mali
    (Timbuku)



    Burkina Faso (Bani)



    Northern Nigeria






    The 2 instruments are:

    KORA



    RITI (Called ENDINGIDI in East Africa)






    The 2 instruemnts are:

    KAMELE NGONI (or also written Kamele N'goni)



    FULA FLUTE (the Flute of Fulani people)




    Music from other parts of Africa
    :



    Whispered songs come from Southern Uganda/Rwanda and Burundi, but now are almost disappeared and only in Burundi you can find them

    INANGA (also called Enanga)




    ADUNGU



    Theorists say that Adungu were a common musical instrument along Africa, in ancient times

    ANCIENT EGYPTIAN ADUNGU-LIKE INSTRUMENT




    ---------- Post added at 10:36 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:09 AM ----------

    Another song played with Adungu

    Last edited by Pxel1995; 10-17-2013 at 11:17 AM.

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  3. #2
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    This is dope. I have heard this tradition style before and I thinks its beautiful. Welcome to FP!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mwandishi View Post
    This is dope. I have heard this tradition style before and I thinks its beautiful. Welcome to FP!!
    Thank you

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    Very beautiful. I always got a place in my heart for African music.
    Everybody yelled surprise...I wasn't surprised...

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    In this music we can hear how Djembes, Dununs and Tamani are played at a professional level
    (djembe sound = snare, dunun sound = kick, tamani = a sort of drop in a pot full of water)

    Djembe


    Dunun


    Tamani




    ---------- Post added at 11:50 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:57 AM ----------

    JELI NGONI (also written D'jeli N'goni)
    It is considered the standard Ngoni





    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia.org
    The ngoni is known to have existed since 1352, when Ibn Battuta, a Moroccan traveller reported seeing one in the court of Mansa Musa. It is believed to have evolved into the banjo in North America after Mande slaves were exported there. Battuta also reported thebalafon.
    Mansa Musa





    ---------- Post added at 12:23 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:50 AM ----------

    AKONTING (also written Ekonting)




    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia.org
    The akonting (or ekonting in French transliteration) is the folk lute of the Jola people, found in Senegal, Gambia, and Guinea-Bissau.
    Jola oral tradition places the birthplace of the akonting in the village of Kanjanka in Lower Casamance (Senegal), near the banks of the Casamance River. The name of the instrument's home village is recalled in the most common tuning pattern for the akonting's three open strings (from the 3rd short "thumb" string to the 1st long melody string): kan (the 5th note of the scale, tuned an octave higher), jan (root note), ka (flatted 7th note). Like in the traditional old-time/folk styles of playing the 5-string banjo, the akonting is tuned in different tunings. Using the kanjanka tuning pattern of 5/1/-7, a common tuning in Casamance is dGF. In Gambia, for another variant the 1st long melody is raised a semitone (half-step) higher to make a natural 7th note, as in cFE.

    Recent findings presented by researchers Daniel Laemouahuma Jatta, Ulf Jägfors, and Shlomo Pestcoe at The 8th Annual Banjo Collectors Gathering (December, 2005) – an annual international conference of the foremost collectors and scholars of 19th and early 20th century banjos, which also serves as the principal forum for presentations of new research on the banjo's history and organology – indicate that the banjo is probably descended from the many different types of gourd-bodied folk/artisan plucked lutes found throughout West Africa, like the akonting.



    THE BANJO AND ITS AFRICAN ROOTS



    ---------- Post added at 12:46 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:23 PM ----------

    KORA



    Quote Originally Posted by Wkipedia.org France
    Griots say that the first kora was invented buy a genius woman, that was living in a cave of Kansala, in Gambia.
    Astonished by the instrument a great Tiramakhan Traoré, a 13th-century (1200 A.D.) general in the Mali Empire who served under Sunjata Keità, decided to oust her, with the help of his haunting friends, Waly Kelendjan and Djelimaly Oulé Diabaté.
    Djemali was the griot of the group, and he will pass the instrument to his son Kamba. The instrument will pass from father to son, until Tilimaghan Diabaté, who will intruduce it in Mali.
    Caves of Gambia



    Mali Empire



    Mandinka (Malinka) Sword



    Music commonly sung by griots for people who are ancestors of Tiramakhan, namely people with Traore (Tarawole) and Diabate (Jobarteh) surnames



    Another Kora music

    Last edited by Pxel1995; 10-17-2013 at 01:51 PM.

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    Quite the lengthy post, but all excellent music, I love it!
    Hit me up on Facebook! Producer album on Spotify and Bandcamp if you want to check it out.

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    Nice post. Just noting that is the more traditional/ancestral type of music/instruments.

    The current sound of african music would be among these and more : makossa/dombolo/coupé-décalé.

    It uses these yamaha synthesizers heavy and the common drumkit.
    Last edited by iambase; 10-17-2013 at 02:17 PM.
    **NEW song (from 2011 though)**


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    Quote Originally Posted by iambase View Post
    Nice post. Just noting that is the more traditional/ancestral type of music/instruments.

    The current sound of african music would be among these and more : makossa/dombolo/coupé-décalé.

    It uses these yamaha synthesizers heavy and the common drumkit.
    Yes, you're right.

    I love Meiway from Ivory Cost. He sing in French and his native language


    But I keep this thread on traditional music

  14. #9
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    lol this isn't new i have heard all of this before i'm southeastern nigerian

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    Quote Originally Posted by EnigmaticHipster View Post
    lol this isn't new i have heard all of this before i'm southeastern nigerian


    Yes, I'm African too, I'm Rwandan.

    This post is meant for everyone never heard this music before.

    ---------- Post added at 02:44 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:39 PM ----------

    I love how mud structures are found in almost all the northern and central part of the continent, even in wet places.





    Last edited by Pxel1995; 10-18-2013 at 06:07 AM.

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