Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: What Percussion Instruments Does A Reggae Track Usually Consist of?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Nitty Gritty 12-Bit City
    Posts
    83
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    What Percussion Instruments Does A Reggae Track Usually Consist of?

    Sign in to disable this ad
    I caught myself listening to some of my Bob Marley records today and started picturing him and his band and stage performing. That's when I found out I didn't even know all the instruments that were being played in his songs. I know he probably had an electric piano, bass guitar, drumkit, woodblock, cowbell, gyro, tambourine, and some steel drums, but the rest of the sh*t he be using is a total mystery to me so I was hoping maybe some of yall could tell me the basic instruments a Reggae track would consists. What are some hand drums that are used in Reggae?
    [b]Current Setup[/b]
    Ensoniq ASR-10
    Mackie Onyx 1640
    Tascam DA-88 Recorder
    DBX 166 Compressor
    Lexicon PCM91 Reverb Processor
    2 Technics SL-1200MK2 w/M44-7s
    Pioner DJM-707

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Kingston, Jamaica
    Posts
    346
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Originally posted by I.Q.
    I caught myself listening to some of my Bob Marley records today and started picturing him and his band and stage performing. That's when I found out I didn't even know all the instruments that were being played in his songs. I know he probably had an electric piano, bass guitar, drumkit, woodblock, cowbell, gyro, tambourine, and some steel drums, but the rest of the sh*t he be using is a total mystery to me so I was hoping maybe some of yall could tell me the basic instruments a Reggae track would consists. What are some hand drums that are used in Reggae?
    STEEL DRUMS?!?

    dude wrong island

    The back in the day Wailers would have had an electric piano (Rhodes or Wurlitzer), an organ like a Hammond B-3, brass section, electric bass, lead and rhythm electric guitars, percussion, and traps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Nitty Gritty 12-Bit City
    Posts
    83
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Originally posted by engineroom


    STEEL DRUMS?!?

    dude wrong island

    The back in the day Wailers would have had an electric piano (Rhodes or Wurlitzer), an organ like a Hammond B-3, brass section, electric bass, lead and rhythm electric guitars, percussion, and traps.
    I heard a steel drum in the beggining of "Get up, Stand Up" I'm pretty sure it was a steel drum.
    well thanks anyways.
    [b]Current Setup[/b]
    Ensoniq ASR-10
    Mackie Onyx 1640
    Tascam DA-88 Recorder
    DBX 166 Compressor
    Lexicon PCM91 Reverb Processor
    2 Technics SL-1200MK2 w/M44-7s
    Pioner DJM-707

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Kingston, Jamaica
    Posts
    346
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Originally posted by I.Q.

    I heard a steel drum in the beggining of "Get up, Stand Up" I'm pretty sure it was a steel drum.
    well thanks anyways.
    the only steel drums you will hear in jamaica are in cheesy tourist spots- steel drum (or more properly "steel pan") is from Trinidad (DUST IN DEH FACE for all my Exodus fans...)

    i think you heard something else, i don't recall ever hearing any pan in Bob's music.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Gent, Belgium, Europe
    Posts
    1,026
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    the thing you heared was a clean snarehits (snares are down) with some chorus and reverb on it, no steeldrums

    steeldrums are upperclass in jamaica, rasta's never use steeldrums

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Kingston, Jamaica
    Posts
    346
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Originally posted by selector waxx
    the thing you heared was a clean snarehits (snares are down) with some chorus and reverb on it, no steeldrums

    steeldrums are upperclass in jamaica, rasta's never use steeldrums
    "upper class?"

    where do you get that from?

    let me repeat... STEEL PAN IS NOT JAMAICAN.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Gent, Belgium, Europe
    Posts
    1,026
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    wel, i know many jamaicans and they say steeldrums is a calypso/soca instrument, that music is rich black man/tourist music, rasta's and most other ppl from the ghetto's listen to dancehall, reggae, and maybe hiphop, rnb, soul, funk and african music, not soca and calypso.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Kingston, Jamaica
    Posts
    346
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Originally posted by selector waxx
    wel, i know many jamaicans and they say steeldrums is a calypso/soca instrument, that music is rich black man/tourist music, rasta's and most other ppl from the ghetto's listen to dancehall, reggae, and maybe hiphop, rnb, soul, funk and african music, not soca and calypso.
    you know this BS is constantly repeated everywhere

    soca and calypso is culturally equivalent to reggae in Trinidad and the rest of the English speaking caribbean- it is the poor man music, the sufferers music, the voice of the people- steelpan is especially a part of this- if you have ever been in the north stand during panorama the BIGGEST support is for Despos from Laventille (a very poor part of Port Of Spain). steelpan is from man in the ghetto in trinidad WHO WERE TOO POOR TO BUY PROPER INSTRUMENTS who decided to invent their own from discarded 40 gallon oil drums. carnival is a celebration with serious cultural roots and expression, in fact it draws much deeper on real African roots than anything in reggae or rasta does.

    in jamaica, wealthier (uptown) people are traditionally who could afford to fly to the EC for carnival (and who also put on the much smaller local soca events), thus Jamaicans generally have had a very skewed understanding of carnival and calypso & soca and think it is rich man thing. this is where the misunderstanding arises from- jamaicans ignorant of the culture of their neighbours (as usual).

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Jamaica (We don't li
    Posts
    2,819
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Originally posted by engineroom


    you know this BS is constantly repeated everywhere

    soca and calypso is culturally equivalent to reggae in Trinidad and the rest of the English speaking caribbean- it is the poor man music, the sufferers music, the voice of the people- steelpan is especially a part of this- if you have ever been in the north stand during panorama the BIGGEST support is for Despos from Laventille (a very poor part of Port Of Spain). steelpan is from man in the ghetto in trinidad WHO WERE TOO POOR TO BUY PROPER INSTRUMENTS who decided to invent their own from discarded 40 gallon oil drums. carnival is a celebration with serious cultural roots and expression, in fact it draws much deeper on real African roots than anything in reggae or rasta does.

    in jamaica, wealthier (uptown) people are traditionally who could afford to fly to the EC for carnival (and who also put on the much smaller local soca events), thus Jamaicans generally have had a very skewed understanding of carnival and calypso & soca and think it is rich man thing. this is where the misunderstanding arises from- jamaicans ignorant of the culture of their neighbours (as usual).
    That pretty much summed it up.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Gent, Belgium, Europe
    Posts
    1,026
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Originally posted by engineroom


    you know this BS is constantly repeated everywhere

    soca and calypso is culturally equivalent to reggae in Trinidad and the rest of the English speaking caribbean- it is the poor man music, the sufferers music, the voice of the people- steelpan is especially a part of this- if you have ever been in the north stand during panorama the BIGGEST support is for Despos from Laventille (a very poor part of Port Of Spain). steelpan is from man in the ghetto in trinidad WHO WERE TOO POOR TO BUY PROPER INSTRUMENTS who decided to invent their own from discarded 40 gallon oil drums. carnival is a celebration with serious cultural roots and expression, in fact it draws much deeper on real African roots than anything in reggae or rasta does.

    in jamaica, wealthier (uptown) people are traditionally who could afford to fly to the EC for carnival (and who also put on the much smaller local soca events), thus Jamaicans generally have had a very skewed understanding of carnival and calypso & soca and think it is rich man thing. this is where the misunderstanding arises from- jamaicans ignorant of the culture of their neighbours (as usual).
    this is what i wanted to tell but more detailed and better written

    thnx engine room

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •