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Thread: mics

  1. #1
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    mics

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    What's the prefered mic for recording dancehall vox?

  2. #2
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    It varies. Dancehall is no different from other genres. Mics used for Hip Hop, R & B and Country can be used. I use an SM57. Others use the Rode series as well as others.

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    Good Dynamic Mic with a wide diaphram. Yeah the Rhode series are good for the price. Look in to the basics of mics so you know what to look for.

    http://www.soundinstitute.com/article_detail.cfm/ID/65
    "The wise general looks to the enemy for food.
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    I agree with the whole concept of dynamics and such, However I'm a firm believer in using the right tool for the job or application. I would got to my local retailer and listen to a few mics side by side (A,Bing) and decide which sounds the best to me. Take this said mic to the lab and see if I still like the sound.
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    I personally use Studio Projects C1s...these things sound so damn close to a Neumann U87 (a recording industry standard)...at a fraction of the cost. I personally do not like to use dymanic/coil mics (Shure SMs) for vocals in a studio environment if I do not have to. They are great for live applications though. The best thing to do, is choose a mic that fits the types of vocal timbre, not style, being recorded.

    - KB
    Last edited by spydakb; 02-02-2004 at 11:36 AM.
    Citizen K Productions

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    Originally posted by spydakb
    The best thing to do, is choose a mic that fits the types of vocal timbre, not style, being recorded.

    - KB
    How you do that?
    "The wise general looks to the enemy for food.
    One bushel of enemy food equals twenty bushel of mine" -Sun Tzu
    I.E. To eat a mans food!
    [url= http://www.extracliprecords.com][IMG]http://www.extracliprecords.com/pics/logo1.jpg[/IMG][/url]

  7. #7
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    i have an AKG condensor and a SM58 these are both exellent and capture grest sound but there is a vsti that can emulate different mike sounds. it has all the industry mics and is not a bad piece of kit
    woth it if you want something different otherwise buy yourself somethng like a 57 or 58

  8. #8
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    Xtraclip,

    I guess what I mean by timbre I'm really talking about texture or how the preson's voice sound. This is when you really have to test your ears and listen. For instance, I wouldn't necessarily use a condensor mic that outputs in the mid-highs to highs on a person's voice that is very nasally (sp?) or bright. I personally wouldn't like to use gruff/heavy sounding vocals on a dynamic coil. Also most, if not all, dynamic mics use a small diaphragm. To really capture vocals accurately, one should try to use a mic with a large diaphragm (most condensors). The style of music shouldn't matter because you want the vocals to be recorded with a mic that has as close a flat freq output as possible. The reason why I use the SP C1s are they come close to the U87s (almost every commecial studio on almost every released album had vocals recorded with these things)....they output pretty close to flat with just a little on the top end. I rarely need to put too much eq after I track vocals with these mics. Check them out, a U87 would run around US$2.5K. The SP C1s go for around US$200. Even though the Rodes are popular, many pros (especially the master engineers) I'd spoken to are shocked at the results I get from them and pick up a few themselves. When mi bredren come over to lay tracks. These are the first mics they pull from the closet.

    - KB
    Last edited by spydakb; 02-03-2004 at 11:55 AM.
    Citizen K Productions

    "I ain't got time to bleed!!"

  9. #9
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    Bless for the tip. Im gonna check out that mic.
    "The wise general looks to the enemy for food.
    One bushel of enemy food equals twenty bushel of mine" -Sun Tzu
    I.E. To eat a mans food!
    [url= http://www.extracliprecords.com][IMG]http://www.extracliprecords.com/pics/logo1.jpg[/IMG][/url]

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