Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Chord Progression Chart

  1. #1
    NavieD is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    162
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Chord Progression Chart

    Sign in to disable this ad
    Hey everyone,

    I am a sample-based beatmaker and I am recently starting to learn some of the basic compositional skills that I will be needing. Right now I am trying to come up with the best way to come up with a bassline, and I came across a chord progression chart and I would like to know if it is valid or not?

    =========================================

    To create your own chord progressions use this table:

    I........any chord
    II.......Iv, V, VII
    III......II, VI
    IV.......I,V,VII
    V........I
    VI.......II, IV
    VII......I, III

    The above are the names of the 7 chords in regular major scale, basically the above is a map for chord progressions. In the first column are the 7 chords, in the second column are chords that sound good after the the leading chord is played, i.e. chord V, sounds best when followed by chord I.

    How to do it: Start with a chord, follow that chord with another that is in the second colum (and same row). NEXT, go to that second chords row, and repeat (use a chord from that chords second column) EXAMPLE: start with chord I, column 2 says i can pick any chord, so i pick IV, then column two of IV says i can pick I, V, or VII-i pick VII, then I will repeat with VII, and pick V.

    it looks like this I-IV-VII-V that is my progression! now all i have to do is play it, and it should sound good (add a little creative timing and i have a progression) you can get tons of good combos using this method.

    =========================================

    Right now I am making a bassline underneath a sample and I have the root key as C (or I). The note after this I am unsure of, but the note after that one is a B (or VII). Now my question is, is the only note that will fit in between these two notes a D or F, because according to that chart, those are the only two notes that could lead to a B. I could play the C again, but other than that, do I have to go to D or F by default?
    twitter.com/itsnavied

  2. #2
    KelevraOne's Avatar
    KelevraOne is offline Not too Kelevra son
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Youngstown, Oh
    Posts
    3,002
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by NavieD View Post
    Hey everyone,

    I am a sample-based beatmaker and I am recently starting to learn some of the basic compositional skills that I will be needing. Right now I am trying to come up with the best way to come up with a bassline, and I came across a chord progression chart and I would like to know if it is valid or not?

    =========================================

    To create your own chord progressions use this table:

    I........any chord
    II.......Iv, V, VII
    III......II, VI
    IV.......I,V,VII
    V........I
    VI.......II, IV
    VII......I, III

    The above are the names of the 7 chords in regular major scale, basically the above is a map for chord progressions. In the first column are the 7 chords, in the second column are chords that sound good after the the leading chord is played, i.e. chord V, sounds best when followed by chord I.

    How to do it: Start with a chord, follow that chord with another that is in the second colum (and same row). NEXT, go to that second chords row, and repeat (use a chord from that chords second column) EXAMPLE: start with chord I, column 2 says i can pick any chord, so i pick IV, then column two of IV says i can pick I, V, or VII-i pick VII, then I will repeat with VII, and pick V.

    it looks like this I-IV-VII-V that is my progression! now all i have to do is play it, and it should sound good (add a little creative timing and i have a progression) you can get tons of good combos using this method.

    =========================================

    Right now I am making a bassline underneath a sample and I have the root key as C (or I). The note after this I am unsure of, but the note after that one is a B (or VII). Now my question is, is the only note that will fit in between these two notes a D or F, because according to that chart, those are the only two notes that could lead to a B. I could play the C again, but other than that, do I have to go to D or F by default?
    Nope you'll find a lot of chord progression break the key that their in. For example the chord progression for Hey ya goes from G Major to C Major to D Major to E major. The Chord Progression Chart is great as guide to making chord progression but I wouldn't use it all the time. Some of the better chord progressions don't follow the chart at all.

  3. #3
    NavieD is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    162
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Excellent, thank you for the response sir.
    twitter.com/itsnavied

  4. #4
    KelevraOne's Avatar
    KelevraOne is offline Not too Kelevra son
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Youngstown, Oh
    Posts
    3,002
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    regarding your help on the bassline riff you might want to consider the notes present in 7th chords. it depends on the type of music you're sampling though. If it's jazz then the next note could be almost anything seeing as how jazz and blues don't follow the normal rules of music theory.

  5. #5
    bandcoach's Avatar
    bandcoach is online now Zukatoku - Mod Scientist
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    16,457
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 23 Times in 22 Posts
    Your chart is inadequate. See chordmaps for a better one.

    Your bass line C down to G up to B.

    Why? C chord has C-E-G
    G chord has G-B-D

    Using notes from both chords will link this up nicely ~ I am speaking as a very experienced (34+ years) bass player and composer
    Last edited by bandcoach; 01-07-2014 at 12:46 PM.
    BC: I've been making music since Before Computers were common in music
    Abnormal thoughts and insights available here
    Tutorials and other ideas available here
    My SoundCloud

  6. #6
    Little Raabe is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I'm not sure if this will help you but to make a good bass line, I would find out what the key to the song you are making is in and producing a bass line within the scale of the key... I.E: If I made a beat with samples to a song that were in the key of A minor (Which has the same keys as the C major scale*) an easy way to come up with a great sounding bass line will be to plug the bass notes in the scale of A minor (or C major) and the easiest way to do this will to remember this: In my example the song is in A minor (which we figured out) so my Root note is A. now the scale of A (starting from the root note) goes up like this, A,B,C,D,E,F,G, & then back to A (it is the only scale (including C major) that does not have flats or sharps in it). which goes like this (starting on the root note) A - W - H - W - W - H - W - W - A. (W= Whole Step & H= Half Step) on a piano every key is a semi-tone (or Half step*) so if I hit the A key on a piano a Whole step up will be the next white key "B" (a Whole step is 2 Half steps) and a half step up will be the notes right after the "B" which is C so if you start on A and go up the scale like this (AWHWWHWWA) it will go with any music that is in the key of A minor or C Major (because those keys are within the scale) so Since your song is C and you said it definitely has a B in it then it is definitely in the key of C major and any white key you play on the bass plug-in should fit the song in some way if done right. and if your real specific with it and are guessing the note after "A" and before "B" at least you now know it has to be a white key (knowing that the scale C major and A minor dont have sharps or flats (black keys) in their scale) so I hope this helped somewhat lol Also if you understoof the whole step half step trick then you can use the same technique for a major scale. C Major starting on the root note goes like this: C-WWHWWW-C. Now, if you start on the root note and play up the scale of C major qith the whole and half notes you will note that you are only playing the white keys once again. Now make an amazing bass line!

  7. #7
    NavieD is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    162
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Damn thanks a lot. I'm gonna have to take some time to learn my scales
    twitter.com/itsnavied

  8. #8
    Robot Sunset VII is offline Warrior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    82
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    do all these "rules" signify a positive melody? what if you are trying to make something dark? do the same rules apply?

  9. #9
    bandcoach's Avatar
    bandcoach is online now Zukatoku - Mod Scientist
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    16,457
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 23 Times in 22 Posts
    It's about interval choice - what notes follow on. Dark usually means using minor intervals, e.g. E up to C or C down to E is a minor 6th, B up to C or C down to B is a minor 2nd, many others as well.

    These build tension and expectations. E up to C is usually followed by B or Bb.

    Check my sig links for more stuff to help you out in this never ending quest for the"rules" of composition.
    BC: I've been making music since Before Computers were common in music
    Abnormal thoughts and insights available here
    Tutorials and other ideas available here
    My SoundCloud

  10. #10
    Ankshis's Avatar
    Ankshis is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    52
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    i need to get 20 posts to see your sig links bad because that sounds very informative...lol. so "dark" music usually follows their own set of rules? same as happy music or inspirational and so on and so forth? im kind of new to music theory and ive been producing music for years and im at the point where i need to learn why i should be doing "this" to achieve "that type of mood"

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Special 93% Offer

Got beats? Samples? Mixing and mastering services? Get a head start with this 93% OFF special offer!