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Thread: Reggae melody in scales and chords

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    Reggae melody in scales and chords

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    How to make a reggae melody in scales and chords ....pls provide me an sample
    Last edited by djbuddhi; 12-26-2010 at 11:49 PM.
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    Reggae is more about the rythm. There are no reggae scales or chords. Listen to things that you like to get an idea of reggae music and what idea's might work.

    EP

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    You are right EP, the word reggae is a descriptive, onomatopoeic word for the scratching rhythm you hear on the guitar.

    As for chords/scales, sorry you are wrong.

    A lot of reggae uses m7 chords and as such the melodic material also tends towards using the natural minor scale. Tempos are often slower, as the apocryphal story goes, it was invented one long hot summer in the late 1960's so the music was slow and the dancing was slow so that no-one got too hot.

    The following example uses a Cm7 chord (CEbGBb) and the C natural minor scale (CDEbFGAbBbC). An electric piano plays the typical reggae rhythmic pattern on the 3 and 4 16ths of each beat. The horns are playing a typical reggae horn pattern. As is the bass.



    It goes through several variations of the underlying rhythmic ideas to be found in a typical reggae drum part - One drops with various hihat patterns then a steppers kick part (4 on the floor) with a one drop snare and the same various hihat patterns. 6'06" all up.

    Then the piece modulates to C major. The chord is C7 (CEGBb) and the mode is C Mixolydian CDEFGABbC (essentially F major starting and finishing on C).

    Notation or a midi file is available if you are interested.
    Last edited by bandcoach; 12-27-2010 at 05:23 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandcoach View Post
    You are right EP, the word reggae is a descriptive, onomatopoeic word for the scratching rhythm you hear on the guitar.

    As for chords/scales, sorry you are wrong.

    A lot of reggae uses m7 chords and as such the melodic material also tends towards using the natural minor scale. Tempos are often slower, as the apocryphal story goes, it was invented one long hot summer in the late 1960's so the music was slow and the dancing was slow so that no-one got too hot.

    The following example uses a Cm7 chord (CEbGBb) and the C natural minor scale (CDEbFGAbBbC). An electric piano plays the typical reggae rhythmic pattern on the 3 and 4 16ths of each beat. The horns are playing a typical reggae horn pattern. As is the bass.



    It goes through several variations of the underlying rhythmic ideas to be found in a typical reggae drum part - One drops with various hihat patterns then a steppers kick part (4 on the floor) with a one drop snare and the same various hihat patterns. 6'06" all up.

    Then the piece modulates to C major. The chord is C7 (CEGBb) and the mode is C Mixolydian CDEFGABbC (essentially F major starting and finishing on C).

    Notation or a midi file is available if you are interested.
    beautiful!!!! simple beautiful!!!!

    there is nothing like examples of what you are talking about...

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    pls share the midi file ...this really great
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    So if you play certain scales or chords it will cease to be Reggae? (Very large list of sub-genres to think about too)

    EP

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    Quote Originally Posted by Emmapeel9 View Post
    So if you play certain scales or chords it will cease to be Reggae? (Very large list of sub-genres to think about too)

    EP
    I smell a troll.

    I did not say that and you know it.

    I mentioned the most frequently (statistically speaking) used chords and scales. If you have issues or take exception to reducing to common factors (a common practice when first leaning to compose in a new style/genre), point out specifics rather than talking in generalities.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bandcoach View Post
    I smell a troll.

    I did not say that and you know it.

    I mentioned the most frequently (statistically speaking) used chords and scales. If you have issues or take exception to reducing to common factors (a common practice when first leaning to compose in a new style/genre), point out specifics rather than talking in generalities.
    So you agree with me then; "There are no Reggae scales or chords"? You can play any you like and it will still be Reggae. (If the rythm is right) You said I was wrong.

    EP

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    now you are being a troll

    Illustrate your point with a musical example or stop spreading your trollness here.
    Last edited by bandcoach; 12-29-2010 at 09:12 AM.
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    Not to spark a huge debate here. But there is no such thing as a reggae scale or reggae chords.

    The most important part of reggae is the rythm, One drop.

    One of the most if not the most popular reggae songs is Bob Marley's "No Woman No Cry" This song is based by the way on Major scale and uses the progression that has been popular for a long time up till today.

    Pay attention to how the kick drom drops and how the bass plays then the guitar playing on the up count. That is the basis of Reggae. Other than that there are no rules.


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