Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 70
Like Tree1Likes

Thread: How to create a fat kick drum ( Great Guide )

  1. #1
    Danzink is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    117
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    How to create a fat kick drum ( Great Guide )

    Sign in to disable this ad
    This is taken from remixmag.com (http://remixmag.com/computer_product...mix_bake_kick/)
    "
    Whether creating Miami Bass music is your life's fantasy or your greatest fear, you probably crave the know-how to manifest those car-rattling, trunk-full-of-funk kick drums. In the arenas of hip-hop, house, techno, downtempo and almost any other electronic genre, molding fat kick drums is absolutely essential. Like grandma's homemade apple pie, the recipe for kick drums is partially a matter of taste. However, there's no substitute for quality ingredients. And just like every pie has its staple ingredients, every slamming kick drum requires some common elements. Let's take a look at the shopping list for killer kick drums.

    THE CRUST

    You'll need a basic shell to begin creating a thick, strong kick. The classics always work; if you're fortunate enough to own a real Roland TR-808, 909 or other famous drum machine with a killer kick, use it copiously. If you're not one of those chosen few, pay close attention to your original source. For example, if you use a sampler, understand that not all “808 Kick” samples are the same; some sound great, and some just plain suck. There are a lot of reasons for that, including how many generations from the original the sample is, the sampling rate and bit depth of the sampler, how the kick was first sampled and so on. Be as choosy as possible with your individual samples — don't use a mediocre sample just because it has 808 in the name and therefore is “supposed” to sound fat. Seek out a better 808 sample, or use something else that is simply bigger sounding. Remember, the time you spend finding sweet original sources won't be in vain, especially if you reuse the resulting samples for multiple songs.
    BORROW SOME SUGAR

    An old saying goes, “Good art borrows, great art steals.” A nice way to start out with great raw kick material is to sample directly from the source. If you don't own, but have access to a 909, then sample it directly. Or take one of your favorite producer's tracks on vinyl or CD, find a naked kick drum in there and sample it. Be cautious with that approach for a couple of reasons: Copyright issues around sampling even small bits have become a dangerously gray area, and I would never personally advise using any source straight out of the can, even from a royalty-free sample library. While it may be an excellent start, it's unoriginal. Customize whatever you bite. Treat your samples as a sculptor would treat clay; mold each one to create a trademark sound for yourself. One effective way to customize a fat kick is to take a tip from the synth manufacturers: If a sound is thin, pile another (or a few more) on top. When doing so, it's important to use different sounds; layering two identical kicks will result in a louder kick, but it won't change the basic tone. Remember the sculptor approach here: Even if you are using two good-sounding individual samples, they may not instantly sound great together. For example, I find that when layering kicks, while the thickness may be good, sustain is often overkill. The final result often benefits from a little doctoring on the tail of one (or both) of the samples and other hands-on sonic surgery.
    ADD THE FILLING

    Once a nice, basic kick is achieved, treating it with two of the mastering engineer's favorite tools is often the next step. Artfully applying a compressor (to just the kick) can go a long way toward creating a signature sound and a huge kick. Compression is one of those “secret spices,” and how to apply it is a whole topic in itself. One recommendation I will make, however, is to use a multiband compressor. With one of those, you can isolate compression on certain frequency ranges. That is perfect if, for example, you want to push the sub of your kick without emphasizing the higher frequencies (which often affect the tone of the attack), or vice-versa. EQ comes after compression in my signal chain. By now the kick should already sound pretty fat; I aim to shave unnecessary frequencies here rather than artificially boosting too much. This is also where you can actualize trademark sounds, while also fine-tuning them to work alongside other elements in specific tracks. I often scoop out mids and highs, especially frequencies above about 500 Hz. Even though I like thick, deep kicks, unless I'm going for a really dublike sound, I often truncate the lowest frequencies (usually the sub-50 Hz frequencies). Even when you can't hear the difference when trimming frequencies, doing so can really tighten up your kicks.
    EVEN IT OUT

    You may ask why, when you're trying to fatten up a kick, would you want to trim frequencies? That is one of the keys to achieving great mixes, both in the case of kick drums and in general: You want to avoid too many overlapping frequencies. The more sonic separation you have between elements, the more focused the entire mix will sound. That can be especially important for club music, which often gets played on huge, not necessarily audiophile-quality sound systems. If you haven't run into the following scenario already, I assure you at some point you will: Your bass line and kick drum are competing, and it sounds like you have a weak kick. You boost the kick, but it still sounds muddy. Take the bass out, and suddenly the kick doesn't sound so bad. In a scenario like that, solo the two sounds, listen carefully for where frequencies are overlapping and then try subtractive EQ on one element, then the other and sometimes a bit on both. By scooping out overlapping frequencies, you will often find that both elements seem to magically come forward in the mix before even touching their respective volume levels."



    I would just like to add some of

    my comments to all you people searching for 808 bass kicks and snares. DONT buy/ download an 808 drum kit off the internet search around for them.



    PLACES TO FIND GOOD 808 drums



    Try Buying some G-Unit , 50 cent, Game, Eminem and Dr.Dre albums.
    You will find a lot of naked bass drums in there songs. (Buy CD's other wise the bass would all be distorted and you will end up with rubbish sounds) I found alot in Eminem the RE-UP. So search around.





    The best combination goes: (thats what i think anyway)

    808 bass drum
    2 old vynl break drum
    Compression
    EQ
    likes this.

  2. #2
    Broken Friday's Avatar
    Broken Friday is offline Retired...
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    BLEACH
    Posts
    7,334
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Pin this right here, if you don't you don't care about this site at all.
    I have retired producing to peruse my dreams of becoming a ninja. Teh best ninja ever!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    or you could just do the old noise gate trick

  4. #4
    breal's Avatar
    breal is offline Insane FP Patriot
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,766
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Azrael Kennedy
    or you could just do the old noise gate trick
    Most people sleep on using a gate

  5. #5
    b onix is offline FP Warrior
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    My mom's Basement
    Posts
    727
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    What do you usually use a gate for? I really need to go to tweak headz and learn what I am doing.

  6. #6
    kev_j's Avatar
    kev_j is offline FP Class of 2004
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3,004
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Good read. Nice post.
    "The more you make use of what you have, the more effective you become."

  7. #7
    kev_j's Avatar
    kev_j is offline FP Class of 2004
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    3,004
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    EDIT: Double Post.
    Last edited by kev_j; 11-18-2007 at 06:00 PM.
    "The more you make use of what you have, the more effective you become."

  8. #8
    wan-tan-soup14's Avatar
    wan-tan-soup14 is offline Insane FP Patriot
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    3,809
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    thread of the year

    or the month, at least

  9. #9
    breal's Avatar
    breal is offline Insane FP Patriot
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,766
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by b onix
    What do you usually use a gate for? I really need to go to tweak headz and learn what I am doing.
    A gate can give the track more punch.

  10. #10
    johnnyluke is offline Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    arizona
    Posts
    1,098
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Great post, the multiband compressor part is especially great. Can somebody expound on the gate thing, I'd like to know more about that too....

Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Special 93% Offer

Got beats? Samples? Mixing and mastering services? Get a head start with this 93% OFF special offer!