Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: How can i make my drums knock harder?!!! Similar to cardiak's and tha bizness's drums

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    595
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Sign in to disable this ad
    Banging drums is a trick. To make them bang (and not boom) you have to cut some bass frequencies and boost the mids.
    Download 1,000 free drum samples at DrumSamples.org

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    DRUMS THAT KNOCK sample pack

    The short answer is compression, saturation, distortion, some layering, and raising perceived loudness. After all of this, its important that the elements are mixed correctly.

    I made a drum kit series for producers called DRUMS THAT KNOCK for producers to accomplish this. All of the sounds are super hard hitting and sound great right out of the pack (no FX needed).

    You can check it out at "drumsthatknock (dot com)"
    Last edited by decapmusic; 11-30-2017 at 03:24 PM.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    1. Proper samples or good recordings
    2. Eq ( where it's necessary )
    3. Parallel compression... it's a must!!!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    France
    Posts
    1,093
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 33 Times in 32 Posts
    When mixing, turning down other instruments is the first step. A super precise tuning of the bass is mandatory
    A little clipping at the mastering stage can help. Managing the peak levels is the corner stone.
    Mastering 2 per minute - 7/24/365 - 1 Hour turnaround - Free test - Try now
    MaximalSound.com

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Oklahoma City
    Posts
    13
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
    canyou give us a sample of what you wanting?

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 1 Post
    I'm gonna have to make a tutorial on this sometime soon, but a few things to consider:
    When you're blending to make a strong kick or snare, the stacking causes the volume to boost. You need to reduce the track volume as you go or it will distort. The combination of lows from dif kicks cause even more volume boost from how the lows interact.
    When you hit the compressor- it performs best with the nominal level, so you need to control volume before entering the compressor to get the right response from it.
    Next, the awesome sound of drums is a perception-thing, meaning that it sounds one way to us on its own, but dif in context to the mix. Awesome drum sounds are partly an illusion with how they are stacked and blended into the rest of the song. Often what sounds like a killer drum track turns to mush when cranked loud, and drums are meant to sound awesome loud! So, the type of compression deals with this as well. There are 3 main elements; frequency, the overall sound, and transients (there's more, but that's what you are after). Controlling frequencies is key to getting loud and powerful- both together. Part of the sad truth is that we have to trick our perception on this- we trade some of the really awesome sub-lows for perceived loudness more in the 90-150Hz range to get more volume. This loses some of the hit-your-chest impact, but becomes what sounds bigger and louder to us in the context of the song.
    Overall sound- upper mids tend to communicate volume better than low mids, and super high frequencies can help with the polished and sweetened sound of drums, but does not communicate a lot about volume or "wham" or "bam" of the attack unless...
    #3- the transients. This is the trickiest part to understand, but it is in relation to the lows, the overall sound, and the use of compression. The transient response is the super fast initial attack and what frequencies are making that happen. You can use a transient plugin to increase just the initial transient and give drums massive attack- but they take a lot of peak volume out of the context of the drums. Using compression to give a balance between the bang boom bap whack of the drum and the sustain that helps define its environment and sustain is where you make a signature on the sound. You can get a goo response from a bus compressor with slow attack and fast release, 2:1 or 4:1 ratio and threshold that barely moves the needle. This tends to lock the attack in place and make them sound big with the mix without fluffing it up and making it sound mushy once turned up. For me the successful drum sounds more and more like a real hard attack the louder it is- the peaks need to survive the final mix.
    Hope that helps a little.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •