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Thread: nonexclusive beats?

  1. #1
    dvyce is offline Moderator
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    nonexclusive beats?

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    Nonexclusive beats.

    Who really wants them?

    Do you hear the same exact beat being used on more than one big song?

    What do you think they are worth?


    A song is what defines an artists identity. No "real" artist will use the same backing music for a song on his album which has already been on someone elses album.

    An artist and record company wants a song to be so distinctive that you know what it is from the first second you hear it on the radio... they do not want you to have to listen to half of the song before you figure out which of the 10 songs that use that same beat this one is.

    What is a "nonexclusive" beat? a beat that is not "your own"... it is a "beat" that you very well may hear the next day on someone elses album.

    Hmmmm... does that sound like something with a different name?


    It is no different than a "sample CD"

    A sample CD is full of beats that you license nonexclusively.

    You can get 1000 "beats" on a sample CD for $30.

    That means you are paying 3 cents per "beat" when you buy a sample CD.

    That means that the going rate for a "nonexclusive" beat is around 3 cents.


    People here complain about other producers here devaluing the worth of a "producers" product by charging low prices.

    If you sell a "nonexclusive" beat for $1, that seems like a lot of money for something I can get for 3 cents off of a sample CD.


    Nobody selling "exclusive" beats should be worried about someone selling "nonexclusive" beats. "Nonexclusive" is a totally different market. If you are trying to sell your "beats" with the intent of making it to a "real" album, you will have to be in an "exclusive" market.


    If you want to be "valued" as a producer, you should not worry about what price other people are selling their "beats" for...

    If you want to be "valued" as a producer, you should worry about making excellent music and conducting yourself in a professional manner.


    Remember, the fancy fine dining restaurant that sells a steak for $85 does not care about the truckstop selling a steak (plus 2 side dishes) for $3.


    ...just something to think about
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  2. #2
    Hosey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dvyce
    If you want to be "valued" as a producer, you should worry about making excellent music and conducting yourself in a professional manner.
    Cosign on the whole post, but this in particular is golden.
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  3. #3
    73*'s Avatar
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    Word!

    I personaly believe that those producers selling non-exclusive beats are just there to take advantage of young artist that are foolish enough to think that with 10 or 15 beats, a mic, they will become the next 50cent.

    On a side note this line of thinking could easily be used to discredit the sampling of previously recorded matierial...

  4. #4
    dvyce is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by 73*
    Word!

    I personaly believe that those producers selling non-exclusive beats are just there to take advantage of young artist that are foolish enough to think that with 10 or 15 beats, a mic, they will become the next 50cent.

    On a side note this line of thinking could easily be used to discredit the sampling of previously recorded matierial...

    It is very different from sampling existing records.

    When you sample existing records, it is generally done intentionally to make reference to that record you are sampling from.

    When you use a beat that you have "nonexclusive" rights to, or if you use a beat from a sample CD... you just have a plain old song that can easily be used by other people and which you have no real ownership or identity in.

  5. #5
    MadTiger3000's Avatar
    MadTiger3000 is offline Natural Philospher
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    That post was very good.

    3-cent for 50 Cent
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  6. #6
    R2B
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    THANK YOU!!

    What I still haven't figured out in this non-exclusivity - forgive my ignorance I'm an old school music maker, PRS member et al - is how credits and, in the unlikely event the track really takes off, the authors rights and royalties are sorted out.

    To me 'selling a beat' unlicenced is like selling a lottery ticket that's valid 100 years...
    ** people will forget what you sound like but they'll never forget what you made them feel **

  7. #7
    dvyce is offline Moderator
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    Quote Originally Posted by R2B
    THANK YOU!!

    What I still haven't figured out in this non-exclusivity - forgive my ignorance I'm an old school music maker, PRS member et al - is how credits and, in the unlikely event the track really takes off, the authors rights and royalties are sorted out.

    There is no reason it couldn't work exactly like an "exclusive" (i.e., normal) license... you get whatever writing credit and royalty you agree upon...

    The only difference is that you can continue to license the same beat over and over again to different people.


    (...but why anyone would actually want to license a track that has already been used up is beyond me.)

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dvyce
    ...but why anyone would actually want to license a track that has already been used up is beyond me.

    The only reason I could think of is for a mix tape.

  9. #9
    R2B
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    Quote Originally Posted by dvyce
    (...but why anyone would actually want to license a track that has already been used up is beyond me.)
    From an artistic - and 'vanity' - standpoint, agreed, makes no sense. The thing is, some beats are so bloody catchy they can be milked until the crowd knows them better than the originator. DJs over here call it 'rinsing out'. It's actually common with Jamaican dancehall stuff.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by R2B
    From an artistic - and 'vanity' - standpoint, agreed, makes no sense. The thing is, some beats are so bloody catchy they can be milked until the crowd knows them better than the originator. DJs over here call it 'rinsing out'. It's actually common with Jamaican dancehall stuff.
    Riddims are different, man. Riddims are supposed to be reused to death.
    Last edited by MadTiger3000; 08-06-2007 at 11:32 AM.
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